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Table of Contents 

INTRODUCTION

About This Plan
Authority to Establish the Plan
Smart Growth and the Oak Ridges Moraine
Purpose of this Plan
The Vision for the Oak Ridges Moraine
Plan Objectives
Land Use Designations
Protecting Moraine Integrity
Some Key Land Use Policies
Boundaries
Review and Amendment
How to Read This Plan
How to Use This Plan

OAK RIDGES MORAINE CONSERVATION PLAN REGULATION

Ontario Regulation 140/02 
Link to the Regulation on the Government of Ontario E-Laws website

OAK RIDGES MORAINE CONSERVATION PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION MAP

IMPLEMENTATION

Status and Effect of the Plan
Provincial Obligations and Technical Support
Municipal Implementation
Performance Indicators and Monitoring
Plan Review and Amendment

Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan

The INTRODUCTION and IMPLEMENTATION sections of this document provide both an explanation of the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan and some additional information for users of the plan that is not found in the Oak Ridges Conservation Act, 2001 or the regulation that establishes the Plan. Although they do not form part of the regulation, they will, when read along with the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001 , and the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan, help users of the plan understand how to apply the Plan and legislation. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information provided in these sections, in the event of a conflict, the Act and the Plan supersede these materials.

INTRODUCTION

About This Plan

The Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan is an ecologically based plan established by the Ontario government to provide land use and resource management direction for the 190,000 hectares of land and water within the Moraine. The decisions of provincial ministers, ministries and agencies made under the Planning Act or the Condominium Act, 1998 or in relation to a prescribed matter, are required to conform with this Plan.

Through the legislation and the Plan, the Ontario Government has set a clear policy framework for protecting the Oak Ridges Moraine. This is in keeping with the provincial land use planning system within which municipalities are responsible for implementing provincial policy through their official plans and when making decisions on development applications.

Municipal planning decisions shall also conform with this Plan, which takes precedence over municipal official plans. Municipal plans are required to be brought into conformity with this Plan. Nothing in this Plan is intended to prevent municipalities from adopting official plan policies and zoning by-law provisions that are more restrictive than the policies of this Plan, except where prohibited by this Plan.

The Oak Ridges Moraine is one of Ontario's most significant landforms. This irregular ridge stretches 160 kilometres from the Trent River in the east to the Niagara Escarpment in the west. The Escarpment and Moraine together form the foundation of south-central Ontario's natural heritage and greenspace systems. Strategically located north of and parallel to Lake Ontario, the Moraine divides the watersheds draining south into western Lake Ontario from those draining north into Georgian Bay, Lake Simcoe and the Trent River system. The Moraine shapes the present and future form and structure of the Greater Toronto region, and its ecological functions are critical to the region's continuing health.

The Moraine has a unique concentration of environmental, geological and hydrological
features that make its ecosystem vital to south-central Ontario, including:

  • clean and abundant water resources;
  • healthy and diverse plant and animal habitat;
  • an attractive and distinct landscape;
  • prime agricultural areas;
  • sand and gravel resources close to market.

    The Oak Ridges Moraine is also under increasing pressure for new residential, commercial, industrial and recreational uses which compete with the present natural environment. This Plan builds on years of effort by provincial ministries, the three regions of Durham, Peel and York (Tri-Region Oak Ridges Moraine Strategy), the Conservation Coalition, Moraine-area municipalities and key stakeholders, to provide clarity and certainty about the long-term protection and management of this vital natural resource.

    In May 2001, the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing introduced the Oak Ridges Moraine Protection Act, 2001 , establishing a six-month moratorium on development on the Moraine in order to allow the government to consult on how to protect the Moraine. The Ontario Legislature unanimously passed this Act, which took effect May 17, and later sunset on November 17, 2001.

    After the passage of the Oak Ridges Moraine Protection Act, 2001 , the Minister appointed an Advisory Panel of 13 members drawn from key stakeholder groups, plus a Chair, to advise him on a plan for the future of the Moraine. An Inter-Ministry Team of senior Ontario government officials was also established to work along with the Advisory Panel.

    During July 2001, the Advisory Panel met and developed a series of recommendations that were incorporated in a public consultation document – Share Your Vision for the Oak Ridges Moraine – which the Minister released August 14.

    From August 28 through September 13, 2001 the Advisory Panel and the Inter-Ministry Team participated in day-long stakeholder sessions and evening public meetings in Uxbridge, Caledon East, Vaughan and Cobourg. More than 2,000 people attended these forums.

    Almost 600 written submissions were received by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing on this consultation document through submissions made by website e-mail, mail and the Environmental Bill of Rights registry.

    These consultations gave the public and stakeholders an opportunity to contribute to the development of a long term strategy for the Moraine and provide the province with ideas for legislation and a Plan.

    After this series of stakeholder and public consultation meetings, the Advisory Panel and the Inter-Ministry Team met to finalize their findings and recommendations, which formed the basis of this Plan.

    On November 1, 2001, the Minister announced a comprehensive strategy for the Oak Ridges Moraine which included introducing the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001 (which was passed on December 13, 2001 and received Royal Assent on December 14, 2001) , a proposed Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan, a settlement involving a land exchange proposal and the appointment of the interim board of directors for an Oak Ridges Moraine Foundation.

    Following this announcement, the Ministry continued to obtain input from the public and stakeholders through written, website and Environmental Bill of Rights registry submissions. Just over 600 comments on the comprehensive strategy were submitted during this period. Further input was obtained from submissions made at the Standing Committee hearing on the legislation, held in December 2001. These comments provided valuable input into the legislation and the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan regulation.

    Smart Growth and the Oak Ridges Moraine

    The Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001 and the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan are key elements of Smart Growth.

    Smart Growth is the Ontario government’s long-term strategy for promoting and managing growth in ways that build strong communities, sustain a strong economy and promote a healthy environment. This strategy involves integrating decisions on development, infrastructure and the environment and making sure those decisions are economically sound.

    Authority to Establish the Plan

    The authority for the Minister to establish the Plan comes from the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001.

    Purpose of The Plan

    The purpose of the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan is to provide land use and resource management planning direction to provincial ministers, ministries, and agencies, municipalities, municipal planning authorities, landowners and other stakeholders on how to protect the Moraine's ecological and hydrological features and functions.

    The Vision for the Oak Ridges Moraine

    The Ontario government's vision for the Oak Ridges Moraine is that of "a continuous band of green rolling hills that provides form and structure to south-central Ontario, while protecting the ecological and hydrological features and functions that support the health and well-being of the region's residents and ecosystems".

    Plan Objectives

    The Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001 establishes the following objectives for the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan.

    (a) protecting the ecological and hydrological integrity of the Oak Ridges Moraine Area;

    (b) ensuring that only land and resource uses that maintain, improve or restore the ecological and hydrological functions of the Oak Ridges Moraine Area are permitted;

    (c) maintaining, improving or restoring all the elements that contribute to the ecological and hydrological functions of the Oak Ridges Moraine Area, including the quality and quantity of its water and its other resources;

    (d) ensuring that the Oak Ridges Moraine Area is maintained as a continuous natural landform and environment for the benefit of present and future generations;

    (e) providing for land and resource uses and development that are compatible with the other objectives of the Plan;

    (f) providing for continued development within existing urban settlement areas and recognizing existing rural settlements;

    (g) providing for a continuous recreational trail through the Oak Ridges Moraine Area that is accessible to all including persons with disabilities; and

    (h) providing for other public recreational access to the Oak Ridges Moraine Area; and,

    (i) any other prescribed objectives.

    Land Use Designations

    The Plan divides the Moraine into four land use designations: Natural Core Areas (38% of the Moraine), Natural Linkage Areas (24% of the Moraine), Countryside Areas (30% of the Moraine) and Settlement Areas (8% of the Moraine).

  • Natural Core Areas protect those lands with the greatest concentrations of key natural heritage features which are critical to maintaining the integrity of the Moraine as a whole. Only existing uses and very restricted new resource management, agricultural, low intensity recreational, home businesses, transportation and utility uses are allowed in these areas.

  • Natural Linkage Areas protect critical natural and open space linkages between the Natural Core Areas and along rivers and streams. The only uses that are allowed are those allowed in Natural Core Areas, plus some aggregate resource operations.

  • Countryside Areas provide an agricultural and rural transition and buffer between the Natural Core Areas and Natural Linkage Areas and the urbanized Settlement Areas. Prime agricultural areas as well as natural features are protected. Most of the uses typically allowed in agricultural and other rural areas are allowed here.

    Within the Countryside Areas, the Oak Ridges Moraine Land Use Designation Map also identifies and delineates Rural Settlements. These are existing hamlets or similar small, generally long established communities, that are identified in official plans.

  • Policies on creating and developing new lots in Natural Core Areas, Natural Linkage Areas and Countryside Areas are very restrictive. Exceptions are permitted in the Moraine's Rural Settlements, the Palgrave Estates Community, and for limited residential development in Countryside Areas in the City of Kawartha Lakes and Peterborough and Northumberland Counties once the municipality has an approved growth management study and a rural economic development strategy, as well as a water budget and water conservation plan.

  • Settlement Areas reflect a range of existing communities planned by municipalities to reflect community needs and values. Urban uses and development as set out in municipal official plans are allowed.

    The Oak Ridges Moraine Land Use Designation Map identified as Map No. 208 to the Plan Regulation shows the boundaries of the land use designations and the Rural Settlements and their boundaries.

    The designations and Rural Settlement boundaries may be more precisely delineated in official plans and zoning by-laws as they are brought into conformity with this Plan, in accordance with Section 10 of the Plan.

    Protecting Moraine Integrity

    The Plan identifies key natural heritage features (such as wetlands and woodlands)and hydrologically sensitive features (such as kettle lakes and springs). In Natural Core Areas, Natural Linkage Areas and Countryside Areas, only very restricted new resource management, recreational, transportation, infrastructure and utility uses are permitted within these features. Development near these key natural heritage features and hydrologically sensitive features is only allowed if it will not adversely affect these features. In areas with significant landscape character (called landform conservation areas) in Natural Core Areas, Natural Linkage Areas and Countryside Areas, development will have to meet particularly stringent review and approval standards to ensure that the Moraine is protected. Over 85 per cent of the key natural heritage features are within Natural Core Areas or Natural Linkage Areas.

    The Plan’s water resource policies require municipalities to prepare watershed plans, water budgets and water conservation plans to incorporate into their official plans within specified time periods. Restrictions on large scale development are imposed if this work is not completed. Development in wellhead protection areas and areas highly vulnerable to groundwater contamination is limited. Limitations are also set on impervious surfaces in areas outside Settlement Areas.

    Some Key Land Use Policies

    No new aggregate resource extraction is permitted in Natural Core Areas. In Natural Linkage Areas and Countryside Areas, new aggregate resource operations shall have to meet stringent review and approval standards. New major recreation developments such as golf courses are only permitted in the Countryside Areas and shall be required to meet stringent review and approval standards.

    New transportation and utility corridors or facilities shall only be allowed in Natural Core Areas and Natural Linkage Areas if they are shown to be necessary and there is no reasonable alternative. They shall also have to meet stringent review and approval standards.

    The trail system through the Oak Ridges Moraine shall provide non-motorized recreational access through the Moraine.

    Boundaries

    The Oak Ridges Moraine Area designated under the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001 is shown on the Plan of the Boundary of the Oak Ridges Moraine Area (a series of 18 sheets) established by Ontario Regulation 01/02 .

    The legislation allows the Minister, by regulation, to establish the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan for all or part of this Oak Ridges Moraine Area.

    The outer boundary of this Moraine area generally follows the boundary originally described in publications prepared by the Ontario government in 1990 and 1991. This boundary is based on a number of topographical, geomorphological and geological attributes, including the 245 metre (above sea level) contour along the southern boundary of the Moraine from the Town of Richmond Hill to the eastern boundary of the Municipality of Clarington.

    It has been more precisely defined in Ontario Regulation 01/02 by the Surveyor General employing a method of survey which uses UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator) co­ordinates. The Plan of the Boundary of the Oak Ridges Moraine Area provides the information for establishing the boundary on the ground by a Licensed Ontario Land Surveyor, under instructions for the Surveyor General for the Province of Ontario.

    The Plan applies to the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Area designated by the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Land Use Designation Map. However, the southern boundary of the Plan Area that lies between Bathurst Street in the Town of Richmond Hill and the eastern limit of the municipality of Clarington may be more precisely defined in the Plan as being those lands north of the 245 metre contour as surveyed and contained within the Oak Ridges Moraine Boundary area noted above.

    Review and Amendment

    The Plan shall be reviewed every 10 years to determine whether any revisions should be made.

    During a review, the Minister shall consult with affected ministries, public bodies and municipalities and ensure that the public is given an opportunity to participate.

    The 10-year review cannot consider removing land from the Natural Core Areas or the Natural Linkage Areas.

    How to Read This Plan

    The Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan consists of:

    Part I, GENERAL: Describes how the Plan applies, existing uses, previously authorized uses and exceptions regarding site plan approval. Defines planning or technical terms used throughout the Plan.

    Part II, LAND USE DESIGNATIONS: Describes the purpose, objectives, permitted uses for each of the Moraine’s four land use designations, and lot creation policies for Countryside Areas.

    PART III, PROTECTING ECOLOGICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL INTEGRITY: Identifies the Moraine's key natural, hydrological and landform features and describes specific planning, design and development restrictions and requirements that need to be met to protect the integrity of those features.

    PART IV, SPECIFIC LAND USE POLICIES: Identifies specific planning, design and development restrictions and requirements that may need to be met for specific uses and activities. It also provides policies on lot creation.

    PART V, PRESCRIBED PROVISIONS: Identifies the sections of the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001 that apply to Natural Core Areas, Natural Linkage Areas and Countryside Areas for the purposes of transition, according to subsection 15(2) of the Act.

    Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Land Use Designation Map: Shows the four designations and the Rural Settlements described in PART II.

    How to Use this Plan

    To find out how this Plan affects a specific area or land use or development proposal on the Oak Ridges Moraine, the Plan regulation must be read in its entirety as follows:

    1. Consult the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Land Use Designation Map to determine what designation applies to the area.

    2. Consult PART II to see the policies for that designation and consult PART III to determine any restrictions or requirements that shall be considered to protect ecological and hydrological integrity.

    3. Consult PART IV to determine any additional restrictions or requirements that may apply for the specific use or activity being considered.

    4. Consult PART V to determine the prescribed provisions that apply pursuant to subsection 15(2) of the Act.

    5. Remember that PART I (GENERAL) applies to all development proposals and land uses, including site alteration.

    Users of this Plan also need to consult with the appropriate municipality for information on official plan policies and any other municipal requirements. The Plan is not intended to replace the community planning principles reflected in municipal official plans. However, in the event that there is a conflict, the Act and the Plan take precedence.

    Note : Due to time constraints for copying the materials, the regulation contained in this document does not identify the actual regulation number and Minister’s signature.


    ONTARIO REGULATION
    made under the
    OAK RIDGES MORAINE CONSRVATION ACT, 2001

    OAK RIDGES MORAINE CONSERVATION PLAN

    CONTENTS

    PART I
    GENERAL

    1. Plan
    2. Application
    3. Definitions
    4. Date of commencement of application
    5. Prohibition
    6. Existing uses, buildings and structures
    7. Previously authorized single dwelling
    8. Building or structure previously authorized or authorized under s. 17 (1) of Act
    9. Exception, site plan approval

    PART II
    LAND USE DESIGNATIONS

    10. Division of Plan Area, land use designations
    11. Natural Core Areas
    12. Natural Linkage Areas
    13. Countryside Areas
    14. Residential development in certain parts of Countryside Areas
    15. New lots in Countryside Areas
    16. Plans of subdivision, site plan approval and lot creation in Countryside Areas
    17. Previously authorized uses, buildings and structures in Countryside Areas
    18. Settlement Areas

    PART III
    PROTECTING ECOLOGICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL INTEGRITY

    19. Purpose and application
    20. Supporting connectivity
    21. Minimum area of influence and minimum vegetation protection zone

    KEY NATURAL HERITAGE FEATURES

    22. Key natural heritage features
    23. Natural heritage evaluation

    HYDROLOGICAL FEATURES

    24. Watershed plans
    25. Water budgets and conservation plans
    26. Hydrologically sensitive features
    27. Subwatersheds
    28. Wellhead protection areas
    29. Areas of high aquifer vulnerability

    LANDFORM CONSERVATION AREAS

    30. Landform conservation areas
    Table

    PART IV
    SPECIFIC LAND USE POLICIES

    31. Application
    32. Lot creation
    33. Restriction re agricultural uses, mineral aggregate operations, wayside pits
    34. Uses accessory to agricultural uses
    35. Mineral aggregate operations and wayside pits
    36. Comprehensive rehabilitation plans
    37. Low-intensity recreational uses
    38. Major recreational uses
    39. Trail system
    40. Small-scale commercial, industrial, and institutional uses
    41. Transportation, infrastructure, and utilities
    42. Official plan provisions, wellhead protection areas, areas of high aquifer vulnerability
    43. Sewage and water services
    44. Partial services
    45. Stormwater management
    46. Stormwater management plans
    47. Rapid infiltration basins and columns

    PART V
    PRESCRIBED PROVISIONS

    48. Prescribed provisions, subsection 15 (2) of Act
    49. Commencement

    PART I GENERAL

    Plan
    1. In this Regulation, "Plan" means the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan.

    Application
    2. (1) This Plan applies to the area shown as the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Area on the map entitled "Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Land Use Designation Map", numbered 208, dated April 17, 2002 and on file in the offices of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing at Toronto.

    (2) Copies of the land use designation map referred to in subsection (1) are available for public inspection,

    (a) at the government information office located at the Macdonald Block at 900 Bay Street, Toronto; and

    (b) at the Ministry of Natural Resources district offices located at,

    (i) 50 Bloomington Road West, Aurora, and

    (ii) 300 Water Street, Peterborough.

    (3) The land use designation map referred to in subsection (1) is also posted on the internet at http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/oakridgesmoraine/land_use_full-e.asp.

    (4) Despite subsection (1), along the part of the southern boundary of the Plan Area that lies between UTM T2034 and UTM T1266 as shown on the plan referred to in subsection 1 (1) of Ontario Regulation 01/02, land is in the Plan Area if,

    (a) it is above the contour of elevation 245.00 Canadian Geodetic Vertical Datum 1928 (GDVD28); and

    (b) it is within the Oak Ridges Moraine Area as designated by Ontario Regulation 01/02.

    Definitions
    3. (1) In this Plan,

    "accessory use" means a use of land, buildings or structures that is normally incidental or subordinate to the principal use, building or structure located on the same lot;

    "adverse effect" means any impairment, disruption, destruction or harmful alteration;

    "adversely affect" means to have an adverse effect on;

    "agricultural uses" means,

    (a) growing crops, including nursery and horticultural crops,

    (b) raising livestock and other animals, including poultry and fish, for food and fur,

    (c) aquaculture, and

    (d) agro-forestry and maple syrup production;

    "agriculture-related uses" means commercial and industrial uses that are,

    (a) small-scale,

    (b) directly related to a farm operation, and

    (c) required in close proximity to the farm operation;

    "animal agriculture" means growing, producing and raising farm animals including, without limitation,

    (a) livestock, including equines, poultry and ratites,

    (b) fur-bearing animals,

    (c) bees,

    (d) cultured fish,

    (e) deer and elk, and

    (f) game animals and birds;

    "aquifer vulnerability" means an aquifer’s intrinsic susceptibility, as a function of the thickness and permeability of overlying layers, to contamination from both human and natural impact on water quality;

    "area of natural and scientific interest" (earth science) means an area that has been,

    (a) identified as having earth science values related to protection, scientific study or education, and

    (b) further identified by the Ministry of Natural Resources using evaluation procedures established by that Ministry, as amended from time to time;

    "area of natural and scientific interest" (life science) means an area that has been,

    (a) identified as having life science values related to protection, scientific study or education, and

    (b) further identified by the Ministry of Natural Resources using evaluation procedures established by that Ministry, as amended from time to time;

    "bed and breakfast establishment" means an establishment that provides sleeping accommodation (including breakfast and other meals, services, facilities and amenities for the exclusive use of guests) for the travelling or vacationing public in up to three guest rooms within a single dwelling that is the principal residence of the proprietor of the establishment;

    "connectivity" means the degree to which key natural heritage features are connected to one another by links such as plant and animal movement corridors, hydrological and nutrient cycling, genetic transfer, and energy flows through food webs;

    "development" means the creation of a new lot, a change in land use, or the construction of buildings and structures, any of which require approval under the Planning Act , the Environmental Assessment Act , or the Drainage Act , but does not include,

    (a) the construction of facilities for transportation, infrastructure and utilities uses, as described in section 41, by a public body, or

    (b) for greater certainty,

    (i) the reconstruction, repair or maintenance of a drain approved under the Drainage Act and in existence on November 15, 2001, or

    (ii) the carrying out of agricultural practices on land that was being used for agricultural uses on November 15, 2001;

    "dwelling unit" means one or more habitable rooms, occupied or capable of being occupied as an independent and separate housekeeping establishment, in which separate kitchen and sanitary facilities are provided for the exclusive use of the occupants;

    "earth science values" means values that relate to the geological, soil and landform features of the environment;

    "ecological features" means naturally occurring land, water and biotic features that contribute to ecological integrity;

    "ecological functions" means the natural processes, products or services that living and non-living environments provide or perform within or between species, ecosystems and landscapes, including hydrological functions and biological, physical, chemical and socio-economic interactions;

    "ecological integrity", which includes hydrological integrity, means the condition of ecosystems in which,

    (a) the structure, composition and function of the ecosystems are unimpaired by stresses from human activity,

    (b) natural ecological processes are intact and self-sustaining, and

    (c) the ecosystems evolve naturally;

    "endangered species" means any native species, as listed in the regulations under the Endangered Species Act , that is at risk of extinction throughout all or part of its Ontario range if the limiting factors are not reversed;

    "farm vacation home" means an establishment that provides sleeping accommodation (including participation in farm activities, meals, services, facilities and amenities for the exclusive use of guests) for the travelling or vacationing public in up to three guest rooms within a single dwelling that is located on a farm and is the principal residence of the proprietor of the establishment;

    "fish habitat" means the spawning grounds and nursery, rearing, food supply and migration areas on which fish depend directly or indirectly in order to carry out the life processes, as further identified by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (Canada);

    "forest access road" means a one or two-lane unpaved road that is designed to provide access to and within a woodland for wildlife, fish and forest management purposes;

    "forest management" means the management of woodlands, including accessory uses such as the construction and maintenance of forest access roads and maple syrup production facilities,

    (a) for the production of wood and wood products, including maple syrup,

    (b) to provide outdoor recreation opportunities,

    (c) to maintain, and where possible improve or restore, conditions for wildlife, and

    (d) to protect water supplies;

    "groundwater recharge" means the replenishment of subsurface water,

    (a) resulting from natural processes, such as the infiltration of rainfall and snowmelt and the seepage of surface water from lakes, streams and wetlands, and

    (b) resulting from human intervention, such as the use of stormwater management systems;

    "habitat of endangered, rare and threatened species" means land that,

    (a) is an area where individuals of an endangered species, a rare species or a threatened species live or have the potential to live and find adequate amounts of food, water, shelter, and space needed to sustain their population, including an area where a species concentrates at a vulnerable point in its annual or life cycle and an area that is important to a migratory or non-migratory species, and

    (b) has been further identified, by the Ministry of Natural Resources or by any other person, according to evaluation procedures established by the Ministry of Natural Resources, as amended from time to time;

    "hazardous waste" has the same meaning as in Regulation 347 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990;

    "home business" means an occupation that,

    (a) involves providing personal or professional services or producing custom or artisanal products,

    (b) is carried on as a small-scale accessory use within a single dwelling by one or more of its residents, and

    (c) does not include uses such as an auto repair or paint shop or furniture stripping;

    "home industry" means a business that,

    (a) is carried on as a small-scale use that is accessory to a single dwelling or agricultural operation,

    (b) provides a service such as carpentry, metalworking, welding, electrical work or blacksmithing, primarily to the farming community,

    (c) may be carried on in whole or in part in an accessory building, and

    (d) does not include uses such as an auto repair or paint shop or furniture stripping;

    "hydrological cycle" means the circulation of water from the atmosphere to the earth and back through precipitation, runoff, infiltration, groundwater flow and evapotranspiration, including the occurrence, circulation, distribution, and chemical and physical properties of water on the surface of the land, in the soil and underlying rocks, and in the atmosphere, and water's interaction with the environment including its relation to living things;

    "hydrological features" means,

    (a) permanent and intermittent streams,

    (b) wetlands,

    (c) kettle lakes and their surface catchment areas,

    (d) seepage areas and springs, and

    (e) aquifers and recharge areas;

    "hydrological functions" means the functions of the hydrological cycle that include the occurrence, circulation, distribution, and chemical and physical properties of water on the surface of the land, in the soil and underlying rocks, and in the atmosphere, and water’s interaction with the environment including its relation to living things;

    "hydrological integrity" means the condition of ecosystems in which hydrological features and hydrological functions are unimpaired by stresses from human activity;

    "hydrologically sensitive feature" means a hydrologically sensitive feature as described in section 26;

    "impervious surface" means a surface that does not permit the infiltration of water, such as a rooftop, sidewalk, paved roadway, driveway or parking lot;

    "kame" means a mound, hummock or conical hill of glacial origin;

    "kettle lake" means a depression formed by glacial action and permanently filled with water;

    "key natural heritage feature" means a key natural heritage feature as described in section 22;

    "landform features" means distinctive physical attributes of land such as slope, shape, elevation and relief;

    "landform conservation area" means a landform conservation area as described in section 30;

    "life science values" means values that relate to the living component of the environment;

    "liquid industrial waste" has the same meaning as in Regulation 347 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990;

    "lot" means a parcel of land that is,

    (a) described in a deed or other document legally capable of conveying an interest in the land, or

    (b) shown as a lot or block on a registered plan of subdivision;

    "major development" means development consisting of,

    (a) the creation of four or more lots,

    (b) the construction of a building or buildings with a ground floor area of 500 m² or more, or

    (c) the establishment of a major recreational use as described in section 38;

    "meander belt" means the land across which a stream shifts its channel from time to time;

    "mineral aggregate" means gravel, sand, clay, earth, shale, stone, limestone, dolostone, sandstone, marble, granite, rock or other material prescribed under the Aggregate Resources Act , but does not include metallic ores, asbestos, graphite, kyanite, mica, nepheline syenite, talc, wollastonite, or other material prescribed under that Act;

    "mineral aggregate operation" means,

    (a) an operation, other than a wayside pit, conducted under a licence or permit under the Aggregate Resources Act , and

    (b) associated facilities used in the extraction, transportation, beneficiation, processing or recycling of mineral aggregate or the production of related by-products;

    "natural self-sustaining vegetation" means self-sustaining vegetation dominated by native plant species;

    "net developable area" means the area of a lot or site, less any area that is within a key natural heritage feature or a hydrologically sensitive feature;

    "Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Area" and "Plan Area" mean the areas described in section 2;

    "partial service" means connections linking a building to,

    (a) a communal sewage or water service or a full municipal sewage or water service, and

    (b) an individual on-site sewage or water system;

    "portable asphalt plant" means a temporary facility, to be dismantled at the completion of a construction project, where,

    (a) equipment is used to heat and dry mineral aggregate and to mix it with bituminous asphalt to produce asphalt paving material, and

    (b) bulk materials used in the process described in clause (a) are kept;

    "prime agricultural area" means an area that is,

    (a) designated as prime agricultural land in the relevant official plan, or

    (b) identified through an alternative agricultural land evaluation system approved by the Government of Ontario;

    "prime agricultural land" means,

    (a) land where fruit and vegetable crops and greenhouse crops are grown,

    (b) agriculturally developed organic soil land, or

    (c) land with Class 1, 2 or 3 soils according to the Canada Land Inventory;

    "rare species" means a native species that is not currently at risk of becoming threatened but, because of its limited distribution, small population or specialized habitat needs, could be put at risk of becoming threatened through all or part of its Ontario range by changes in land use or increases in certain types of human activity;

    "retirement home" means a building in which,

    (a) accommodation is provided, mainly for retired persons,

    (b) common kitchen and dining facilities are provided for the residents, and

    (c) common lounges, recreation rooms and health care facilities may also be provided for the residents;

    "sand barrens" means land (not including land that is being used for agricultural purposes and no longer exhibits sand barrens characteristics) that,

    (a) has sparse or patchy vegetation that is dominated by plants that are,

    (i) adapted to severe drought and low nutrient levels, and

    (ii) maintained by severe environmental limitations such as drought, low nutrient levels and periodic disturbances such as fire,

    (b) has less than 25 per cent tree cover,

    (c) has sandy soils (other than shorelines) exposed by natural erosion, depositional process or both, and

    (d) has been further identified, by the Ministry of Natural Resources or by any other person, according to evaluation procedures established by the Ministry of Natural Resources, as amended from time to time;

    "saturated zone" means the zone below the water table where the spaces between soil grains are filled with water;

    "savannah" means land (not including land that is being used for agricultural purposes and no longer exhibits savannah characteristics) that,

    (a) has vegetation with a significant component of non-woody plants, including tallgrass prairie species that are maintained by seasonal drought, periodic disturbances such as fire, or both,

    (b) has from 25 per cent to 60 per cent tree cover,

    (c) has mineral soils, and

    (c) has been further identified, by the Ministry of Natural Resources or by any other person, according to evaluation procedures established by the Ministry of Natural Resources, as amended from time to time;

    "self-sustaining vegetation" means vegetation dominated by plants that can grow and persist without direct human management, protection, or tending;

    "significant" means identified as significant by the Ministry of Natural Resources, using evaluation procedures established by that Ministry, as amended from time to time;

    "single dwelling" means a building containing only one dwelling unit;

    "site" means the land subject to an application;

    "site alteration" means activities such as filling, grading and excavation that would change the landform and natural vegetative characteristics of land, but does not include,

    (a) the construction of facilities for transportation, infrastructure and utilities uses, as described in section 41, by a public body, or

    (b) for greater certainty,

    (i) the reconstruction, repair or maintenance of a drain approved under the Drainage Act and in existence on November 15, 2001, or

    (ii) the carrying out of agricultural practices on land that was being used for agricultural uses on November 15, 2001;

    "subwatershed" means an area that is drained by a tributary or some defined portion of a stream;

    "surface catchment area" means the area including and surrounding a kettle lake or wetland, from which surface runoff drains directly into the kettle lake or wetland;

    "sustainable", when used with respect to a natural resource, means that the natural resource is able to support a particular use or activity without being adversely affected;

    "tallgrass prairie" means land (not including land that is being used for agricultural purposes and no longer exhibits tallgrass prairie characteristics) that,

    (a) has vegetation dominated by non-woody plants, including tallgrass prairie species that are maintained by seasonal drought, periodic disturbances such as fire, or both,

    (b) has less than 25 per cent tree cover,

    (c) has mineral soils, and

    (d) has been further identified, by the Ministry of Natural Resources or by any other person, according to evaluation procedures established by the Ministry of Natural Resources, as amended from time to time;

    "threatened species" means any native species that is at risk of becoming endangered throughout all or part of its Ontario range if the limiting factors are not reversed;

    "time of travel" means the time that is needed for groundwater to travel a specified horizontal distance in the saturated zone;

    "unserviced park" means a park that provides recreational opportunities and facilities, including playing fields, but without outdoor lighting, accessory commercial facilities, paved parking lots or permanent water or sewer facilities;

    "valleyland" means a natural area that occurs in a valley or other landform depression that has water flowing through or standing for some period of the year;

    "watershed" means an area that is drained by a river and its tributaries;

    "wayside pit" means a temporary pit opened or used by or for a public body solely for the purpose of a particular project of road construction and not located on the road right of way;

    "wellhead protection area" means the surface and subsurface area surrounding a water well or well field that supplies a public water system and through which contaminants are reasonably likely to move so as eventually to reach the water well or well field;

    "wetland" means land such as a swamp, marsh, bog or fen (not including land that is being used for agricultural purposes and no longer exhibits wetland characteristics) that,

    (a) is seasonally or permanently covered by shallow water or has the water table close to or at the surface,

    (b) has hydric soils and vegetation dominated by hydrophytic or water-tolerant plants, and

    (c) has been further identified, by the Ministry of Natural Resources or by any other person, according to evaluation procedures established by the Ministry of Natural Resources, as amended from time to time;

    "wildlife habitat" means land that,

    (a) is an area where plants, animals and other organisms live or have the potential to live and find adequate amounts of food, water, shelter and space to sustain their population, including an area where a species concentrates at a vulnerable point in its annual or life cycle and an area that is important to a migratory or non-migratory species, and

    (b) has been further identified, by the Ministry of Natural Resources or by any other person, according to evaluation procedures established by the Ministry of Natural Resources, as amended from time to time;

    "woodland" means a treed area, woodlot or forested area, other than a cultivated fruit or nut orchard or a plantation established for the purpose of producing Christmas trees;

    "zone of contribution", when used in reference to a period of time, means the area within which the water pumped from a well originates during that time.

    (2) Maps illustrating locations of key natural heritage features and areas of natural and scientific interest (earth science) may be made available by the Ministry of Natural Resources.

    Date of commencement of application

    4. (1) For the purposes of this Plan, an application shall be deemed to have been commenced on the day set out in the relevant clause of subsection 15 (4) of the Act.

    (2) In this Plan,

    "application" includes a matter, proceeding or request.

    Prohibition

    5. No person shall, except as permitted by this Plan, (a) use land or any part of it; (b) undertake development or site alteration with respect to land; or (c) erect, move, alter or use a building or structure or any part of it.

    Existing uses, buildings and structures

    6. (1) Nothing in this Plan applies to prevent,

    (a) the use of any land, building or structure for a purpose prohibited by this Plan, if the land, building or structure was lawfully used for that purpose on November 15, 2001 and continues to be used for that purpose; or

    (b) the erection or use for a purpose prohibited by this Plan of a building or structure for which a permit has been issued under subsection 8 (2) of the Building Code Act, 1992 on or before November 15, 2001 if,

    (i) the permit has not been revoked under subsection 8 (10) of the Building Code Act, 1992 , and

    (ii) the building or structure when erected is used and continues to be used for the purpose for which it was erected.

    (2) Nothing in this Plan applies to prevent the expansion of an existing building or structure on the same lot, if the applicant demonstrates that,

    (a) there will be no change in use; and

    (b) the expansion will not adversely affect the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    (3) Despite subsection (2), an existing mineral aggregate operation or an existing wayside pit within a Natural Core Area may not be expanded beyond the boundary of the area under licence or permit.

    (4) Nothing in this Plan applies to prevent the expansion of an existing institutional use, if the applicant demonstrates that,

    (a) there will be no change in use; and

    (b) the expansion will not adversely affect the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    (5) Nothing in this Plan applies to prevent the reconstruction, within the same location and dimensions, of an existing building or structure that is damaged or destroyed by causes beyond the owner’s control, and the reconstructed building or structure shall be deemed to be an existing building or structure if there is no change in use and no intensification of the use.

    (6) Nothing in this Plan applies to prevent the conversion of an existing use to a similar use, if the applicant demonstrates that the conversion,

    (a) will bring the use into closer conformity with this Plan; and

    (b) will not adversely affect the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    (7) If an existing use has adverse effects on the ecological integrity of the Plan Area, any application to expand the building, structure or use or to convert the existing use to a similar use shall be considered with the objective of bringing the use into closer conformity with this Plan.

    (8) In this section,

    "existing" means lawfully in existence on November 15, 2001, and for greater certainty does not include a use, building or structure that is in existence on that date without being lawful;

    "institutional use" includes, without limitation, a long-term care facility, hospital, school, university or college.

    Previously authorized single dwelling

    7. Nothing in this Plan applies to prevent the use, erection or location of a single dwelling if,

    (a) the use, erection and location would have been permitted by the applicable zoning by-law on November 15, 2001; and

    (b) the applicant demonstrates, to the extent possible, that the use, erection and location will not adversely affect the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    Building or structure previously authorized or authorized under s. 17 (1) of Act

    8. Nothing in this Plan applies to prevent the use, erection or location of a building or structure if,

    (a) the use, erection and location were authorized by the approval of an application that was commenced before November 17, 2001 and approved after that date; or

    (b) the use, erection and location were authorized by the approval of an application that was commenced after November 17, 2001 and decided in accordance with subsection 17 (1) of the Act.

    Exception, site plan approval

    9. An application for site plan approval under section 41 of the Planning Act is not required to comply with this Plan if it relates to land in respect of which any of the following was commenced before November 17, 2001 and approved after that date:

    1. An application for an amendment to a zoning by-law.

    2. An application for approval of a plan of subdivision under section 51 of the Planning Act .

    3. An application for approval or exemption from approval for a plan of condominium under section 9 of the Condominium Act, 1998 .

    PART II
    LAND USE DESIGNATIONS

    Division of Plan Area, land use designations

    10. (1) The Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Area is divided into areas subject to the following land use designations, as shown on the land use designation map referred to in section 2:

    1. Natural Core Areas, which are areas with a high concentration of key natural heritage features, hydrologically sensitive features or landform conservation areas.

    2. Natural Linkage Areas, which are areas forming part of a central corridor system that support or have the potential to support movement of plants and animals among the Natural Core Areas, Natural Linkage Areas, river valleys and stream corridors.

    3. Countryside Areas, which are areas of rural land use such as agriculture, recreation, residential development, Rural Settlements, mineral aggregate operations, parks and open space. Rural Settlements, which form part of Countryside Areas and are existing hamlets or similar existing small communities, generally long-established and identified in official plans, are also shown on the land use designation map referred to in section 2.

    4. Settlement Areas, which are areas designated for development of an urban type permitting a range of residential, commercial, industrial and institutional uses.

    (2) When official plans and zoning by-laws are amended in accordance with sections 9 and 10 of the Act to bring them into conformity with this Plan, the boundaries of the

    Natural Core Areas, Natural Linkage Areas, Countryside Areas, Rural Settlements and Settlement Areas may be further defined, in a manner that is consistent with the land use designation map referred to in section 2, but with greater precision than the map can show, and subject to subsection (4).

    (3) The further definition of boundaries described in subsection (2) does not require an amendment to this Plan.

    (4) The outer boundary of the Plan Area shall not be further defined under subsection (2).

    Natural Core Areas

    11. (1) The purpose of Natural Core Areas is to maintain and where possible improve or restore the ecological integrity of the Plan Area, by,

    (a) maintaining, and where possible improving or restoring, the health, diversity, size, and connectivity of key natural heritage features, hydrologically sensitive features and the related ecological functions;

    (b) maintaining or restoring natural self-sustaining vegetation and wildlife habitat;

    (c) maintaining the quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water;

    (d) maintaining groundwater recharge;

    (e) maintaining natural stream form and flow characteristics; and

    (f) protecting landform features.

    (2) Natural Core Areas also have the objectives of,

    (a) accommodating a trail system through the Plan Area and trail connections to it; and

    (b) providing for limited economic development that is compatible with clause (a) and subsection (1).

    (3) The following uses are permitted with respect to land in Natural Core Areas, subject to Parts III and IV:

    1. Fish, wildlife and forest management.

    2. Conservation projects and flood and erosion control projects.

    3. Agricultural uses.

    4. Transportation, infrastructure, and utilities as described in section 41, but only if the need for the project has been demonstrated and there is no reasonable alternative.

    5. Home businesses.

    6. Home industries.

    7. Bed and breakfast establishments.

    8. Farm vacation homes.

    9. Low-intensity recreational uses as described in section 37.

    10. Unserviced parks.

    11. Uses accessory to the uses set out in paragraphs 1 to 10.

    Natural Linkage Areas
    12. (1) The purpose of Natural Linkage Areas is to maintain, and where possible improve or restore, the ecological integrity of the Plan Area, and to maintain, and where possible improve or restore, regional-scale open space linkages between Natural Core Areas and along river valleys and stream corridors, by,

    (a) maintaining, and where possible improving or restoring, the health, diversity, size, and connectivity of key heritage features, hydrologically sensitive features and the related ecological functions;

    (b) maintaining, and where possible improving or restoring natural self-sustaining vegetation over large parts of the area to facilitate movement of plants and animals;

    (c) maintaining a natural continuous east-west connection and additional connections to river valleys and streams north and south of the Plan Area;

    (d) maintaining the quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water;

    (e) maintaining groundwater recharge;

    (f) maintaining natural stream form and flow characteristics; and

    (g) protecting landform features.

    (2) Natural Linkage Areas also have the objectives of,

    (a) accommodating a trail system through the Plan Area and trail connections to it; and

    (b) providing for limited economic development that is compatible with clause (a) and subsection (1).

    (3) The following uses are permitted with respect to land in Natural Linkage Areas, subject to Parts III and IV:

    1. Fish, wildlife and forest management.

    2. Conservation projects and flood and erosion control projects.

    3. Agricultural uses.

    4. Transportation, infrastructure, and utilities as described in section 41, but only if the need for the project has been demonstrated and there is no reasonable alternative.

    5. Home businesses.

    6. Home industries.

    7. Bed and breakfast establishments.

    8. Farm vacation homes.

    9. Low-intensity recreational uses as described in section 37.

    10. Unserviced parks.

    11. Mineral aggregate operations.

    12. Wayside pits.

    13. Uses accessory to the uses set out in paragraphs 1 to 12.

    Countryside Areas
    13. (1) The purpose of Countryside Areas is to encourage agricultural and other rural uses that support the Plan’s objectives, by,

    (a) protecting prime agricultural areas;

    (b) providing for the continuation of agricultural and other rural land uses and normal farm practices; and

    (c) maintaining the rural character of the Rural Settlements.

    (2) Countryside Areas also have the objectives of,

    (a) maintaining, and where possible improving or restoring, the ecological integrity of the Plan Area;

    (b) maintaining, and where possible improving or restoring, the health, diversity, size, and connectivity of key natural heritage features, hydrologically sensitive features and the related ecological functions;

    (c) maintaining the quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water;

    (d) maintaining groundwater recharge;

    (e) maintaining natural stream form and flow characteristics;

    (f) protecting landform features;

    (g) accommodating a trail system through the Plan Area and trail connections to it; and

    (h) providing for economic development that is compatible with subsection (1) and with clauses (a) to (g).

    (3) The following uses are permitted with respect to land in Countryside Areas, subject to Parts III and IV:

    1. Fish, wildlife and forest management.

    2. Conservation projects and flood and erosion control projects.

    3. Agricultural uses.

    4. Transportation, infrastructure, and utilities as described in section 41.

    5. Home businesses.

    6. Home industries.

    7. Bed and breakfast establishments.

    8. Farm vacation homes.

    9. Low-intensity recreational uses as described in section 37.

    10. Unserviced parks.

    11. Mineral aggregate operations.

    12. Wayside pits.

    13. Agriculture-related uses.

    14. Small-scale commercial, industrial, and institutional uses as described in
    section 40, subject to subsection (5).

    15. Major recreational uses as described in section 38, subject to subsection (5).

    16. Residential development in accordance with section 14.

    17. Uses accessory to the uses set out in paragraphs 1 to 16.

    (4) With respect to land in a Rural Settlement, the following uses are permitted, subject to Parts III and IV, in addition to the uses listed in subsection (3):

    1. Residential development in accordance with paragraphs 3 and 4 of subsection 15 (1).

    2. Small-scale commercial, industrial, and institutional uses as described in section 40, but not subject to clauses (1) (a), (1) (c) or (2) (a) of that section.

    (5) The uses described in paragraphs 14 and 15 of subsection (3) are prohibited in,

    (a) prime agricultural areas; and

    (b) areas designated primarily for agricultural uses in the applicable official plan.

    Residential development in certain parts of Countryside Areas
    14. (1) Residential development is permitted with respect to land in the Palgrave Estates Residential Community as shown on the land use designation map referred to in section 2, subject to the Town of Caledon Official Plan, as amended from time to time, and to the following provisions of this Plan:

    1. Sections 20 to 26.

    2. Subsection 27 (3).

    3. Sections 28 and 29.

    4. Subsections 30 (1), (12) and (13).

    5. Subsections 41 (1), (4) and (5).

    6. Sections 42 to 47.

    7. The Table to Part III.

    (2) Residential development is permitted with respect to land in the City of Kawartha Lakes, the County of Peterborough and the County of Northumberland, except in,

    (a) prime agricultural areas; and

    (b) areas designated primarily for agricultural uses in the applicable official plan.

    (3) With respect to land in the City of Kawartha Lakes, the County of Peterborough and the County of Northumberland, an application for residential development shall not be approved unless,

    (a) on or before October 22, 2003 or the later date on which the relevant municipality adopts an official plan amendment that is subject to a declaration made by the Minister under subsection 9 (10) of the Act,

    (i) the relevant municipality has completed a comprehensive growth management study, including a rural economic development strategy, that demonstrates the need for residential development, and

    (ii) the relevant municipality’s official plan conforms with this Plan and includes specific detailed policies governing residential development; and

    (b) the relevant municipality has completed a water budget and water conservation plan in accordance with section 25 that demonstrates the availability of sufficient water resources to support residential development.

    (4) The policies referred to in subclause (3) (a) (ii) may,

    (a) further limit the areas within which residential development is permitted; and

    (b) limit the extent of this type of development.

    (5) The policies referred to in subclause (3) (a) (ii) shall establish strict planning, design and construction standards so as to,

    (a) encourage clustering or other innovative design;

    (b) require that disturbance to the natural landscape and environment be minimized; and

    (c) maintain, and where possible improve or restore, the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    New lots in Countryside Areas
    15. (1) New lots may be created in Countryside Areas for the following purposes only, and subject to Parts III and IV:

    1. The purposes specified in section 32 (lot creation).

    2. Residential development permitted under section 14.

    3. Minor infill within Rural Settlements.

    4. Minor rounding-out of Rural Settlements designated in the applicable official plan as appropriate for this type of lot creation.

    (2) A lot created in accordance with paragraph 4 of subsection (1) may encroach into a Settlement Area, but not into a Natural Core Area or Natural Linkage Area.

    Plans of subdivision, site plan approval and lot creation in Countryside Areas
    16. (1) Plans of subdivision with respect to land in Countryside Areas shall,

    (a) provide for large, continuous open space blocks linking key natural heritage features and hydrologically sensitive features, to ensure connectivity; and

    (b) design lots and roads so as to minimize stream crossings and extensions into key natural heritage features.

    (2) With respect to land in Countryside Areas, the approval authority shall ensure that a condition requiring the applicant to ensure that natural self-sustaining vegetation is maintained or restored for the long-term protection of any key natural heritage feature or hydrologically sensitive feature on the lot or lots created is imposed,

    (a) on every subdivision and site plan approval; and

    (b) on every consent to the creation of a lot under section 15 or subsection 32 (1).

    Previously authorized uses, buildings and structures in Countryside Areas
    17. (1) Nothing in this Plan applies to prevent a use or the erection or location of a building or structure with respect to land in a Countryside Area if,

    (a) the use, erection and location would have been permitted by the applicable zoning by-law on November 15, 2001;

    (b) the use, erection and location are permitted by the applicable official plan and zoning by-laws as amended in accordance with sections 9 and 10 of the Act to bring them into conformity with this Plan, although they do not comply with the provisions listed in subsections 19 (2) and 31 (3);

    (c) in the case of major development, the applicant complies with clause 43 (1) (b); and

    (d) the application conforms to sections 20, 22, 23, 26, 28 and 29, subsections 45 (7) and (8) and section 47.

    (2) Subsection (1) does not apply with respect to land within a Rural Settlement.

    (3) Nothing in this Plan applies to prevent a use or the erection or location of a building or structure within a Rural Settlement if,

    (a) the use, erection and location would have been permitted by the applicable zoning by-law on November 15, 2001;

    (b) the use, erection and location are permitted by the applicable official plan and zoning by-laws as amended in accordance with sections 9 and 10 of the Act to bring them into conformity with this Plan, although they do not comply with the provisions listed in subsections 19 (2) and 31 (3);

    (c) the application conforms to sections 28 and 29, subsections 45 (7) and (8) and section 47; and

    (d) the applicant demonstrates, to the extent possible, that the use, erection or location will not adversely affect the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    Settlement Areas
    18. (1) The purpose of Settlement Areas is to focus and contain urban growth by,

    (a) minimizing the encroachment and impact of development on the ecological functions and hydrological features of the Plan Area;

    (b) promoting the efficient use of land with transit-supportive densities, through intensification and redevelopment within existing urban areas; and

    (c) providing for the continuation and development of urban land uses consistent with the growth management strategies identified in the applicable official plans.

    (2) Settlement Areas also have the objectives of,

    (a) maintaining, and where possible improving or restoring, the health, diversity, size and connectivity of key natural heritage features, hydrologically sensitive features and the related ecological functions;

    (b) accommodating a trail system through the Plan Area and trail connections to it;

    (c) promoting strong communities, a strong economy and a healthy environment; and

    (d) providing for economic development that is compatible with subsection (1) and clauses (a), (b) and (c).

    (3) With respect to land in Settlement Areas, all uses permitted by the applicable official plan are permitted, subject to the provisions of this Plan that are listed in subsections 19 (3) and 31 (4).

    (4) New lots may be created in Settlement Areas, subject to the provisions of this Plan that are listed in subsections 19 (3) and 31 (4).

    (5) With respect to land in a Settlement Area that does not include a key natural heritage feature or a hydrologically sensitive feature, an application for site plan approval under section 41 of the Planning Act is not required to comply with any provision of this Plan except this subsection.

    (6) With respect to land in a Settlement Area, nothing in this Plan applies to prevent a use or the erection or location of a building or structure if,

    (a) the use, erection and location would have been permitted by the applicable zoning by-law on November 15, 2001;

    (b) the use is permitted by the applicable official plan and zoning by-laws as amended in accordance with sections 9 and 10 of the Act to bring them into conformity with this Plan, although the erection and location do not comply with the provisions listed in subsections 19 (3) and 31 (4);

    (c) the use, erection and location conform to sections 28 and 29, subsections 45 (7) and (8) and section 47; and

    (d) the applicant demonstrates, to the extent possible, that the use, erection or location will not adversely affect the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    PART III
    PROTECTING ECOLOGICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL INTEGRITY

    Purpose and application
    19. (1) The purpose of this Part is the integration of environmental and land use planning in order to maintain, and where possible improve or restore, the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    (2) Sections 20 to 26, subsections 27 (1) and (2), sections 28 and 29, subsections 30 (1) to (12) and the Table to this Part apply with respect to land in the Natural Core Areas, Natural Linkage Areas and Countryside Areas.

    (3) The following provisions apply with respect to land in the Settlement Areas:

    1. Sections 21 to 26.

    2. Subsection 27 (3).

    3. Sections 28 and 29.

    4. Subsections 30 (1), (12) and (13).

    5. The Table to this Part.

    Supporting connectivity
    20. Every application for development or site alteration shall identify planning, design and construction practices that ensure that no buildings or other site alterations impede the movement of plants and animals among key natural heritage features, hydrologically sensitive features and adjacent land within Natural Core Areas and Natural Linkage Areas.

    Minimum area of influence and minimum vegetation protection zone

    21. (1) For the purposes of this Part,

    (a) the minimum area of influence that relates to a key natural heritage feature or hydrologically sensitive feature described in Column 2 of the Table to this Part is the area referred to in the corresponding item in Column 3 of the Table; and

    (b) the minimum vegetation protection zone that relates to a key natural heritage feature or hydrologically sensitive feature described in Column 2 of the Table is the area determined in accordance with the corresponding item in Column 4 of the Table.

    (2) If land falls within more than one item in Column 1 of the Table, the provisions that are more restrictive apply.

    (3) With respect to land that is in a Settlement Area on April 22, 2002, any provision referred to in subsection (4) prevails, to the extent of any conflict, over clause (1) (b) and subsection (2).

    (4) Subsection (3) applies with respect to a provision of the applicable official plan or zoning by-laws, as the case may be, that is adopted on the basis of,

    (a) environmental studies; or

    (b) infrastructure planning including, without limitation, environmental assessments, infrastructure servicing studies and master environmental servicing studies.

    KEY NATURAL HERITAGE FEATURES

    Key natural heritage features
    22. (1) The following are key natural heritage features:

    1. Wetlands.

    2. Significant portions of the habitat of endangered, rare and threatened species.

    3. Fish habitat.

    4. Areas of natural and scientific interest (life science).

    5. Significant valleylands.

    6. Significant woodlands.

    7. Significant wildlife habitat.

    8. Sand barrens, savannahs and tallgrass prairies.

    (2) All development and site alteration with respect to land within a key natural heritage feature or the related minimum vegetation protection zone is prohibited, except the following:

    1. Forest, fish, and wildlife management.

    2. Conservation and flood or erosion control projects, but only if they have been demonstrated to be necessary in the public interest after all alternatives have been considered.

    3. Transportation, infrastructure, and utilities as described in section 41, but only if the need for the project has been demonstrated and there is no reasonable alternative.

    4. Low-intensity recreational uses as described in section 37.

    (3) An application for development or site alteration with respect to land within the minimum area of influence that relates to a key natural heritage feature, but outside the key natural heritage feature itself and the related minimum vegetation protection zone, shall be accompanied by a natural heritage evaluation under section 23.

    Natural heritage evaluation
    23. (1) A natural heritage evaluation shall,

    (a) demonstrate that the development or site alteration applied for will have no adverse effects on the key natural heritage feature or on the related ecological functions;

    (b) identify planning, design and construction practices that will maintain and, where possible, improve or restore the health, diversity and size of the key natural heritage feature and its connectivity with other key natural heritage features;

    (c) in the case of an application relating to land in a Natural Core Area, Natural Linkage Area or Countryside Area, demonstrate how connectivity within and between key natural heritage features will be maintained and, where possible, improved or restored before, during and after construction;

    (d) if the Table to this Part specifies the dimensions of a minimum vegetation protection zone, determine whether it is sufficient, and if it is not sufficient, specify the dimensions of the required minimum vegetation protection zone and provide for the maintenance and, where possible, improvement or restoration of natural self-sustaining vegetation within it;

    (e) if the Table to this Part does not specify the dimensions of a minimum vegetation protection zone, determine whether one is required, and if one is required, specify the dimensions of the required minimum vegetation protection zone and provide for the maintenance and, where possible, improvement or restoration of natural self-sustaining vegetation within it; and

    (f) in the case of a key natural heritage feature that is fish habitat, ensure compliance with the requirements of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (Canada).

    (2) In the case of item 4 of the Table to this Part, the basis on which the determination and specification mentioned in clause (1) (e) is done shall include, without limitation, an analysis of land use, soil type, slope class and vegetation type, using criteria established by the Government of Ontario, as amended from time to time.

    HYDROLOGICAL FEATURES

    Watershed plans
    24. (1) Every upper-tier municipality and single-tier municipality shall, on or before April 22, 2003, begin preparing a watershed plan, in accordance with subsection (3), for every watershed whose streams originate within the municipality’s area of jurisdiction.

    (2) The objectives and requirements of each watershed plan shall be incorporated into the municipality’s official plan.

    (3) A watershed plan shall include, as a minimum,

    (a) a water budget and conservation plan as set out in section 25;

    (b) land and water use and management strategies;

    (c) a framework for implementation, which may include more detailed implementation plans for smaller geographic areas, such as subwatershed plans, or for specific subject matter, such as environmental management plans;

    (d) an environmental monitoring plan;

    (e) provisions requiring the use of environmental management practices and programs, such as programs to prevent pollution, reduce the use of pesticides and manage the use of road salt; and

    (f) criteria for evaluating the protection of water quality and quantity, hydrological features and hydrological functions.

    (4) Major development is prohibited unless,

    (a) the watershed plan for the relevant watershed, prepared in accordance with subsection (3), has been completed;

    (b) the major development conforms with the watershed plan; and

    (c) a water budget and conservation plan, prepared in accordance with section 25 and demonstrating that the water supply required for the major development is sustainable, has been completed.

    (5) Subsection (4) applies to every application commenced on or after April 23, 2007.

    (6) Subsection (8) applies to every application commenced before the date mentioned in subsection (5), except an application described in subsection (7).

    (7) Clause (4) (c) applies to every application that is commenced on or after April 22, 2004 and relates to the part of The Regional Municipality of York that is served by the Yonge Street Aquifer.

    (8) An application for major development to which this subsection applies shall not be approved unless,

    (a) the relevant municipality has complied with clause (4) (c); or

    (b) the applicant,

    (i) identifies any hydrologically sensitive features and related hydrological functions on the site and how they will be protected,

    (ii) demonstrates that an adequate water supply is available for the development without compromising the ecological integrity of the Plan Area, and

    (iii) provides, with respect to the site and such other land as the approval authority considers necessary, a water budget and water conservation plan that,

    (A) characterizes groundwater and surface water flow systems by means of modelling,

    (B) identifies the availability, quantity and quality of water sources, and

    (C) identifies water conservation measures.

    Water budgets and conservation plans
    25. (1) Every upper-tier municipality and single-tier municipality shall, on or before April 22, 2003, begin preparing a water budget and conservation plan, in accordance with subsection (2), for every watershed whose streams originate within the municipality’s area of jurisdiction.

    (2) A water budget and conservation plan shall, as a minimum,

    (a) quantify the components of the water balance equation, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, groundwater inflow and outflow, surface water outflow, change in storage, water withdrawals and water returns;

    (b) characterize groundwater and surface water flow systems by means of modelling;

    (c) identify,

    (i) targets to meet the water needs of the affected ecosystems,

    (ii) the availability, quantity and quality of water sources, and

    (iii) goals for public education and for water conservation;

    (d) develop a water-use profile and forecast;

    (e) evaluate plans for water facilities such as pumping stations and reservoirs;

    (f) identify and evaluate,

    (i) water conservation measures such as public education, improved management practices, the use of flow-restricting devices and other hardware, water reuse and recycling, and practices and technologies associated with water reuse and recycling,

    (ii) water conservation incentives such as full cost pricing, and

    (iii) ways of promoting water conservation measures and water conservation incentives;

    (g) analyse the costs and benefits of the matters described in clause (f);

    (h) require the use of specified water conservation measures and incentives;

    (i) contain an implementation plan for those specified measures and incentives that reconciles the demand for water with the water supply;

    (j) provide for monitoring of the water budget and water conservation plan for effectiveness.

    Hydrologically sensitive features

    26. (1) The following are hydrologically sensitive features:

    1. Permanent and intermittent streams.

    2. Wetlands.

    3. Kettle lakes.

    4. Seepage areas and springs.

    (2) All development and site alteration with respect to land within a hydrologically sensitive feature or the related minimum vegetation protection zone is prohibited, except the following:

    1. Forest, fish, and wildlife management.

    2. Conservation and flood or erosion control projects, but only if they are determined to be necessary in the public interest after all alternatives have been considered.

    3. Transportation, infrastructure, and utilities as described in section 41, but only if the need for the project has been demonstrated and there is no reasonable alternative.

    4. Low-intensity recreational uses as described in section 37.

    (3) An application for development or site alteration with respect to land within the minimum area of influence that relates to a hydrologically sensitive feature, but outside the hydrologically sensitive feature itself and the related minimum vegetation protection zone, shall be accompanied by a hydrological evaluation under subsection (4).

    (4) A hydrological evaluation shall,

    (a) demonstrate that the development or site alteration will have no adverse effects on the hydrologically sensitive feature or on the related hydrological functions;

    (b) identify planning, design and construction practices that will maintain, and where possible improve or restore, the health, diversity and size of the hydrologically sensitive feature; and

    (c) determine whether the minimum vegetation protection zone whose dimensions are specified in the Table to this Part is sufficient, and if it is not sufficient, specify the dimensions of the required minimum vegetation protection zone and provide for the maintenance and, where possible, improvement or restoration of natural self-sustaining vegetation within it.

    (5) In the case of items 11 and 12 of the Table to this Part, the basis on which the determination and specification mentioned in clause (4) (c) is done shall include, without limitation, an analysis of land use, soil type and slope class, using criteria established by the Government of Ontario, as amended from time to time.

    Subwatersheds
    27. (1) Except with respect to land in Settlement Areas, all development and site alteration with respect to land in a subwatershed are prohibited if they would cause the total percentage of the area of the subwatershed that has impervious surfaces to exceed,

    (a) 10 per cent; or

    (b) any lower percentage specified in the applicable watershed plan.

    (2) Except with respect to land in Settlement Areas, in considering applications for development or site alteration with respect to land in a subwatershed the approval authority shall take into account the desirability of ensuring that at least 30 per cent of the area of the subwatershed has self-sustaining vegetation.

    (3) With respect to land in Settlement Areas, in considering applications for development or site alteration with respect to land in a subwatershed the approval authority shall consider the importance of,

    (a) ensuring that natural vegetation is maintained, and where possible improved or restored; and

    (b) keeping to a minimum impervious surfaces and their impact on water quality and quantity.

    Wellhead protection areas
    28. (1) Despite anything else in this Plan except subsection 6 (1) and subsection (3) of this section, the following uses are prohibited with respect to land in wellhead protection areas established under section 42:

    1. Storage, except by an individual for personal or family use, of,

    i. petroleum fuels,

    ii. petroleum solvents and chlorinated solvents,

    iii. pesticides, herbicides and fungicides,

    iv. construction equipment,

    v. inorganic fertilizers,

    vi. road salt, and

    vii. contaminants listed in Schedule 3 (Severely Toxic Contaminants) to Regulation 347 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990.

    2. Generation and storage of hazardous waste or liquid industrial waste.

    3. Waste disposal sites and facilities, organic soil conditioning sites, and snow storage and disposal facilities.

    (2) Despite anything else in this Plan except subsection 6 (1) and subsection (3) of this section, the following uses are prohibited with respect to land in the zero to two year time of travel zone within every wellhead protection area established under section 42:

    1. Storage of animal manure, except by an individual for personal or family use.

    2. Animal agriculture, except by an individual for personal or family use.

    3. Storage of agricultural equipment, except by an individual for personal or family use.

    (3) Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to an area in respect of which wellhead protection policies established under clause 42 (1) (b) have been incorporated into the relevant official plan.

    (4) Every person who carries on a use listed in subsection (1) or (2), as owner or operator, shall prepare and maintain a site management and contingency plan that is aimed at reducing or eliminating the creation of materials referred to in subsection (1) or (2), as the case may be, and their release into the environment.

    Areas of high aquifer vulnerability
    29. (1) Despite anything else in this Plan except subsection 6 (1), the uses listed in subsection (5) are prohibited with respect to land in areas of high aquifer vulnerability, as shown on the map entitled "Reference Map for Ontario Regulation **/02 (Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan) made under the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001 " dated March, 2002, on file in the offices of the Ministry of Environment and Energy at Toronto.

    **NOTE Reference to this Regulation will be inserted on filing.

    (2) Copies of the map referred to in subsection (1) are available for public inspection,

    (a) at the government information office located at the Macdonald Block at 900 Bay Street, Toronto; and

    (b) at the Ministry of Natural Resources district offices located at,

    (i) 50 Bloomington Road West, Aurora, and

    (ii) 300 Water Street, Peterborough.

    (3) The boundaries of the areas of high aquifer vulnerability may be further defined in official plans, in a manner that is consistent with the map referred to in subsection (1), but with greater precision than the map can show.

    (4) The further definition of boundaries described in subsection (3) does not require an amendment to this Plan.

    (5) Subsection (1) applies to the following uses:

    1. Generation and storage of hazardous waste or liquid industrial waste.

    2. Waste disposal sites and facilities, organic soil conditioning sites, and snow storage and disposal facilities.

    3. Underground and above-ground storage tanks that are not equipped with an approved secondary containment device.

    4. Storage of a contaminant listed in Schedule 3 (Severely Toxic Contaminants) to Regulation 347 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990.

    LANDFORM CONSERVATION AREAS

    Landform conservation areas

    30. (1) The following, shown on maps entitled "Landform Conservation Areas of the Oak Ridges Moraine", numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4, dated March, 2002 and on file at the district office of the Ministry of Natural Resources at 50 Bloomington Road West, Aurora, are landform conservation areas:

    1. Landform conservation areas (Category 1).

    2. Landform conservation areas (Category 2).

    (2) Copies of the maps referred to in subsection (1) are available for public inspection,

    (a) at the government information office located at the Macdonald Block at 900 Bay Street, Toronto; and

    (b) at the Ministry of Natural Resources district offices located at,

    (i) 50 Bloomington Road West, Aurora, and

    (ii) 300 Water Street, Peterborough.

    (3) When official plans and zoning by-laws are amended in accordance with sections 9 and 10 of the Act to bring them into conformity with this Plan, the boundaries of the landform conservation areas may be further defined, in a manner that is consistent with the maps referred to in subsection (1), but with greater precision than the maps can show.

    (4) The further definition of boundaries described in subsection (3) does not require an amendment to this Plan.

    (5) An application for development or site alteration with respect to land in a landform conservation area (Category 1) shall identify planning, design and construction practices that will keep disturbance to landform character to a minimum, including,

    (a) maintaining significant landform features such as steep slopes, kames, kettles, ravines and ridges in their natural undisturbed form;

    (b) limiting the portion of the net developable area of the site that is disturbed to not more than 25 per cent of the total area of the site; and

    (c) limiting the portion of the net developable area of the site that has impervious surfaces to not more than 15 per cent of the total area of the site.

    (6) An application for development or site alteration with respect to land in a landform conservation area (Category 2) shall identify planning, design and construction practices that will keep disturbance to landform character to a minimum, including,

    (a) maintaining significant landform features such as steep slopes, kames, kettles, ravines and ridges in their natural undisturbed form;

    (b) limiting the portion of the net developable area of the site that is disturbed to not more than 50 per cent of the total area of the site; and

    (c) limiting the portion of the net developable area of the site that has impervious surfaces to not more than 20 per cent of the total area of the site.

    (7) Subsections (5) and (6) do not apply in respect of mineral aggregate operations.

    (8) An application for major development with respect to land in a landform conservation area of either category shall be accompanied by a landform conservation plan that shows, on one or more maps,

    (a) elevation contours in sufficient detail to show the basic topographic character of the site, with an interval of not more than two metres;

    (b) analysis of the site by slope type (for example, moderate or steep);

    (c) significant landform features such as kames, kettles, ravines and ridges; and

    (d) all water bodies including intermittent streams and ponds.

    (9) The landform conservation plan shall also include a development strategy that identifies appropriate planning, design and construction practices to minimize disruption to landform character, including,

    (a) retention of significant landform features in an open, undisturbed form;

    (b) road alignment and building placement to minimize grading requirements;

    (c) concentration of development on portions of the site that are not significant;

    (d) use of innovative building design to minimize grading requirements; and

    (e) use of selective grading techniques.

    (10) An application for development or site alteration that does not constitute major development, with respect to land in a landform conservation area of either category, shall be accompanied by a site plan that,

    (a) identifies the areas within which all building, grading, and related construction will occur;

    (b) demonstrates that buildings and structures will be located within the areas referred to in clause (a) so as to minimize the amount of site alteration required; and

    (c) provides for the protection of areas of natural and scientific interest (earth science) in accordance with subsection (12).

    (11) Subsection (10) does not apply in respect of mineral aggregate operations.

    (12) An application for development or site alteration with respect to land in an area of natural and scientific interest (earth science) or the related minimum area of influence shall be accompanied by an earth science heritage evaluation that,

    (a) identifies planning, design and construction practices that will ensure protection of the geological or geomorphological attributes for which the area of natural and scientific interest was identified; and

    (b) determines whether a minimum vegetation protection zone is required, and if so, specifies the dimensions of that zone and provides for the maintenance and, where possible, improvement or restoration of natural self-sustaining vegetation within it.

    (13) With respect to land in Settlement Areas, in considering applications for development or site alteration within landform conservation areas (Category 1 and 2) the approval authority shall consider the importance of adopting planning, design and construction practices that will keep disturbance to landform character to a minimum, so as to satisfy the requirements of subsections (5) to (11) if possible.

    TABLE
    KEY NATURAL HERITAGE FEATURES,
    HYDROLOGICALLY SENSITIVE FEATURES AND
    AREAS OF NATURAL AND SCIENTIFIC INTEREST (EARTH SCIENCE):
    MINIMUM AREAS OF INFLUENCE
    AND MINIMUM VEGETATION PROTECTION ZONES

    Column 1 Column 2 Column 3 Column 4
    Item Feature Minimum Area of Influence (21) Minimum Vegetation Protection Zone (21, 23, 26 (4), 30 (12))
    1. Wetlands All land within 120 metres of any part of feature All land within 30 metres of any part of feature, subject to clause 23 (d) if a natural heritage evaluation is required
    2. Significant portions of habitat of endangered, rare and threatened species All land within 120 metres of any part of feature As determined by a natural heritage evaluation carried out under section 23
    3. Fish habitat All land within 120 metres of any part of feature All land within 30 metres of any part of feature, subject to clause 23 (1) (d) if a natural heritage evaluation is required
    4. Areas of natural and scientific interest (life science) All land within 120 metres of any part of feature As determined by a natural heritage evaluation carried out under section 23
    5. Areas of natural and scientific interest (earth science) All land within 50 metres of any part of feature As determined by an earth science heritage evaluation carried out under subsection 30 (12)
    6. Significant valleylands All land within 120 metres of stable top of bank All land within 30 metres of stable top of bank, subject to clause 23 (1) (d) if a natural heritage evaluation is required
    7. Significant woodlands All land within 120 metres of any part of feature All land within 30 metres of the base of outermost tree trunks within the woodland, subject to clause 23 (1) (d) if a natural heritage evaluation is required
    8. Significant wildlife habitat All land within 120 metres of any part of feature As determined by a natural heritage evaluation carried out unde r section 23
    9. Sand barrens, savannahs and tallgrass prairies All land within 120 metres of any part of feature All land within 30 metres of any part of feature, subject to clause 23 (1) (d) if a natural heritage evaluation is required
    10. Kettle lakes All land within 120 metres of the surface catchment area All land within the surface catchment area or within 30 metres of any part of feature, whichever is greater, subject to clause 26 (4) (c) if a hydrological evaluation is required
    11. Permanent and intermittent streams All land within 120 metres of meander belt All land within 30 metres of meander belt , subject to clause 26 (4) (c) and subsection 26 (5) if a hydrological evaluation is required
    12. Seepage areas and springs All land within 120 metres of any part of feature All land within 30 metres of any part of feature, subject to clause 26 (4) (c) and subsection 26 (5) if a hydrological evaluation is required

    PART IV
    SPECIFIC LAND USE POLICIES

    Application

    31. (1) The following provisions of this Part apply to land in the Natural Core Areas:

    1. Sections 32 to 34.

    2. Sections 36, 37 and 39.

    3. Subsections 41 (1), (3), (4), (5) and (6).

    4. Sections 42 to 47.

    (2) The following provisions of this Part apply to land in the Natural Linkage Areas:

    1. Sections 32 to 37 and 39.

    2. Subsections 41 (1), (2), (4), (5) and (6).

    3. Sections 42 to 47.

    (3) The following provisions of this Part apply to land in the Countryside Areas:

    1. Sections 32 to 34.

    2. Subsections 35 (1), (4), (5) and (6).

    3. Sections 36 to 40.

    4. Subsections 41 (1), (4), (5) and (6).

    5. Sections 42 to 47.

    (4) The following provisions of this Part apply to land in the Settlement Areas:

    1. Subsections 41 (1), (4) and (5).

    2. Sections 42 to 47.

    Lot creation
    32. (1) A lot may be created only in the following circumstances, and subject to section 15, subsections (2), (3), (4) and (5) of this section, and Part III:

    1. Severance, from a rural lot, of a farm retirement lot or a lot for a residence surplus to a farming operation. The maximum permitted is a cumulative total of one such severance for each rural lot. All consents granted on or after January 1, 1994 are included in the calculation of the cumulative total.

    2. Severance from each other of two or more rural lots that have merged in title. The severance shall follow the original lot lines or original half lot lines.

    3. Allowing land acquisition for transportation, infrastructure, and utilities as described in section 41, but only if the need for the project has been demonstrated and there is no reasonable alternative.

    4. The addition of adjacent land to an existing lot, but only if the adjustment does not result in the creation of a lot that is undersized for the purpose for which it is being or may be used.

    5. Facilitating conveyances to public bodies or non-profit entities for natural heritage conservation.

    6. Severance from each other of parts of a lot that are devoted to different uses, but only if the uses are legally established at the time of the application for severance.

    (2) Subsection (1) applies whether the transaction takes the form of a conveyance, a lease for twenty-one years or more, or a mortgage.

    (3) A lot may be created only if there is enough net developable area on both the severed lot and the remainder lot to accommodate proposed uses, buildings and structures and accessory uses without encroachment on key natural heritage features or hydrologically sensitive features.

    (4) When a lot is created, the municipality shall enter into a site plan agreement or other agreement with the applicant to establish conditions requiring that natural self-sustaining vegetation be maintained or restored in order to ensure the long-term protection of any key natural heritage features and hydrologically sensitive features on the lot.

    (5) A lot shall not be created if this would extend or promote strip development.

    (6) In subsection (1),

    "farm retirement lot" means a lot that is severed from land that is being used in a farming operation, on the application of a person who,

    (a) owned and operated the farm operation, as a full-time farmer, for a substantial number of years,

    (b) was engaged in farming on January 1, 1994 or on an earlier date set out in the applicable official plan, and

    (c) has reached retirement age and is retiring from active working life;

    "original half lot" means half of an original lot that contained 80.9 hectares (200 acres), more or less;

    "original lot" means a township lot shown on a plan certified by the Surveyor General of Ontario as being the original plan of an original survey;

    "residence surplus to a farming operation" means,

    (a) if there are two or more farm residences, both built before 1978, on a lot that is being used in a farming operation, one of those residences that is surplus to the farming operation, or

    (b) if the owner and operator of a farming operation acquires an additional lot and uses it in the consolidated farming operation, any existing farm residence that is surplus to the consolidated farming operation;

    "rural lot" means a lot that is at least 97.5 per cent of the land that is left in an original lot or an original half lot after the deduction of any land that is,

    (a) conveyed at any time for transportation, utilities and infrastructure as described in section 41, whether before, on or after November 16, 2001, or

    (b) validly conveyed before June 27, 1970.

    Restriction re agricultural uses, mineral aggregate operations, wayside pits
    33. (1) The following are specified matters for the purpose of clause 5 (d) of the Act:

    1. Agricultural uses.

    2. Mineral aggregate operations.

    3. Wayside pits.

    (2) Official plans and zoning by-laws shall not contain provisions, with respect to the specified matters listed in subsection (1), that are more restrictive than those in this Plan.

    Uses accessory to agricultural uses
    34. Permitted uses accessory to agricultural uses include, but are not limited to,

    (a) the roadside sale of produce of the farm operation;

    (b) the manufacture of value-added products from produce of the farm operation; and

    (c) a second dwelling that is a temporary, mobile or portable unit, if the applicant demonstrates that the dwelling,

    (i) is required to house help that is needed on the farm operation on a seasonal or full time basis,

    (ii) does not require a consent under section 50 or 53 of the Planning Act , and

    (iii) will not adversely affect the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    Mineral aggregate operations and wayside pits
    35. (1) An application for a mineral aggregate operation or wayside pit shall not be approved unless the applicant demonstrates,

    (a) that the quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water in the Plan Area will be maintained and, where possible, improved or restored;

    (b) that as much of the site as possible will be rehabilitated,

    (i) in the case of land in a prime agricultural area, by restoring the land so that it can be used for agriculture, and

    (ii) in all other cases, by establishing or restoring natural self-sustaining vegetation;

    (c) if there are key natural heritage features on the site or on adjacent land, that their health, diversity, size and connectivity will be maintained and, where possible, improved or restored; and

    (d) if there are areas of natural and scientific interest (earth science) on the site or on adjacent land, that the geological or geomorphological attributes for which they were identified will be protected.

    (2) An application for a mineral aggregate operation or wayside pit with respect to land in a Natural Linkage Area shall not be approved unless the applicant demonstrates,

    (a) that there will be compliance with subsection (1);

    (b) that there will be no extraction within 1.5 metres of the water table;

    (c) that the extraction of mineral aggregates from the site will be completed as quickly as possible;

    (d) that the site will be rehabilitated in stages as quickly as possible; and

    (e) that the entire site will be rehabilitated,

    (i) in the case of land in a prime agricultural area, by restoring the land so that the average soil quality of each area is substantially returned to its previous level, and

    (ii) in all other cases, by establishing or restoring natural self-sustaining vegetation.

    (3) In order to maintain connectivity, when a mineral aggregate operation or a wayside pit is located in a Natural Linkage Area, there shall at all times be an excluded area (which, for greater certainty, may contain both undisturbed land and land whose rehabilitation is complete) that,

    (a) is at least 1.25 kilometres wide;

    (b) lies outside the active or unrehabilitated portions of the area being used; and

    (c) connects parts of the Natural Linkage Area outside the mineral aggregate operation or wayside pit.

    (4) Despite subsection 22 (2), an application for a mineral aggregate operation or wayside pit with respect to land in a key natural heritage feature may be approved if,

    (a) the key natural heritage feature is occupied by young plantations or early successional habitat; and

    (b) the applicant demonstrates that,

    (i) the long-term ecological integrity of the Plan Area will be maintained, or where possible improved or restored,

    (ii) the extraction of mineral aggregates from the area within the key natural heritage feature will be completed, and the area will be rehabilitated, as early as possible in the life of the operation, and

    (iii) the area from which mineral aggregates are extracted will be rehabilitated by establishing or restoring natural self-sustaining vegetation of equal or greater ecological value.

    (5) In subclause (4) (b) (iii),

    "ecological value" means the value of vegetation in maintaining the health of the key natural heritage feature and the related ecological features and ecological functions, as measured by factors such as the diversity of species, the diversity of habitats, and the suitability and amount of habitats that are available for rare, threatened and endangered species.

    (6) An application for a mineral aggregate operation or wayside pit with respect to land in a landform conservation area (Category 1 or 2) shall not be approved unless the applicant demonstrates,

    (a) that the area from which mineral aggregates are extracted will be rehabilitated to establish a landform character that blends in with the landform patterns of the adjacent land; and

    (b) that the long-term ecological integrity of the Plan Area will be maintained, or where possible improved or restored.

    Comprehensive rehabilitation plans
    36. Municipalities and the mineral aggregate industry are encouraged to work together to develop and implement comprehensive rehabilitation plans for parts of the Plan Area that are affected by mineral aggregate operations.

    Low-intensity recreational uses
    37. (1) Low-intensity recreational uses are recreational uses that have minimal impact on the natural environment, and require very little terrain or vegetation modification and few, if any, buildings or structures, including but not limited to the following:

    1. Non-motorized trail uses.

    2. Natural heritage appreciation.

    3. Unserviced camping on public and institutional land.

    4. Accessory uses.

    (2) Small-scale structures accessory to low-intensity recreational uses, such as trails, boardwalks, foot bridges, fences, docks and picnic facilities, are permitted only if the applicant demonstrates that the adverse effects on the ecological integrity of the Plan Area will be kept to a minimum by,

    (a) keeping disturbed areas to a minimum; and

    (b) avoiding the most sensitive portions of the site , such as steep slopes, organic soils and significant portions of the habitat of endangered, rare or threatened species.

    Major recreational uses
    38. (1) Major recreational uses are recreational uses that require large-scale modification of terrain, vegetation or both and usually also require large-scale buildings or structures, including but not limited to the following:

    1. Golf courses.

    2. Serviced playing fields.

    3. Serviced campgrounds.

    4. Ski hills.

    (2) An application to establish or expand a major recreational use shall be accompanied by a recreation plan demonstrating that,

    (a) water use for maintenance or snow-making or both will be kept to a minimum;

    (b) grassed, watered and manicured areas will be limited to sports field surfaces, golf fairways, tees and greens, and landscaped areas around buildings and structures;

    (c) crossings of intermittent and permanent streams will be kept to a minimum;

    (d) water-conserving technologies (such as low flow toilets and shower heads) will be used in clubhouses and restaurants;

    (e) water-conserving technologies (such as timed irrigation systems designed to reduce evaporation losses, and recycling of water from under greens) will be used in the irrigation and watering of sports field surfaces, golf fairways, tees and greens, and landscaped areas around buildings and structures; and

    (f) stormwater treatment facilities will be used to capture and treat runoff from areas with impervious surfaces.

    (3) An application to establish or expand a major recreational use shall be accompanied by a vegetation management plan demonstrating that,

    (a) the application of fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides and fungicides will be limited to sports field surfaces, golf fairways, tees, greens and landscaped areas around buildings and structures, and, in those locations, will be kept to a minimum;

    (b) grass mixtures that require minimal watering and upkeep will be used for sports field surfaces and golf fairways; and

    (c) wherever possible, intermittent stream channels and drainage swales will be kept in a free-to-grow, low-maintenance condition.

    (4) An application to establish or expand a major recreational use shall demonstrate that,

    (a) the recreational activities on the site,

    (i) will be compatible with the natural character of the surrounding area, and

    (ii) will be designed and located so as not to conflict with adjacent land uses; and

    (b) new technologies relating to construction, grounds maintenance and water conservation will be explored and incorporated, as they become available, to help maintain, and where possible improve or restore the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    Trail system
    39. (1) A recreational trail system shall be established to provide continuous access and travel along the entire Plan Area, accessible to all including persons with disabilities.

    (2) The trail system shall,

    (a) be designed to maintain and, where possible, improve or restore the ecological integrity of the Plan Area;

    (b) be located in the Natural Core Areas and Natural Linkage Areas as much as possible;

    (c) be located away from unopened road allowances as much as possible.

    (3) Despite anything else in this Plan, the following uses, buildings and structures are permitted on the trail system:

    1. Non-motorized trail uses.

    2. Parking, signage, washrooms and interpretive facilities to support access to the trail system.

    3. Fencing to define and protect the trails.

    4. Works to improve access to the trail system and remove barriers to its use, for the benefit of all including persons with disabilities.

    5. Works to protect ecologically sensitive portions of the trail system.

    6. Conservation and erosion control to protect or restore key natural heritage features and hydrologically sensitive features and the related ecological functions along the trail system.

    (4) Paragraph 1 of subsection (3) does not prohibit the use of motorized wheelchairs by persons who need them for mobility.

    Small-scale commercial, industrial and institutional uses
    40. (1) Small-scale commercial, industrial and institutional uses,

    (a) are supportive of, complementary to or essential to uses that are permitted in Countryside Areas under sections 13, 14 and 17;

    (b) do not require large-scale modification of terrain, vegetation or both or large-scale buildings and structures; and

    (c) include, but are not limited to,

    (i) farm implement stores, feed stores and country markets,

    (ii) portable mineral aggregate crushing plants, portable asphalt plants and composting plants, and

    (iii) schools, places of worship, community halls, retirement homes, and cemeteries, intended mainly to serve nearby Rural Settlements within the Plan Area.

    (2) An application for a small-scale commercial, industrial or institutional use with respect to land in a Countryside Area shall not be approved unless the applicant demonstrates that,

    (a) it is not feasible to locate the use in a Settlement Area; and

    (b) the buildings and structures will be planned, designed and constructed so as not to adversely affect,

    (i) the rural character of the Countryside Areas, and

    (ii) the ecological integrity of the Plan Area.

    Transportation, infrastructure and utilities
    41. (1) Transportation, infrastructure and utilities uses include,

    (a) public highways;

    (b) transit lines, railways and related facilities;

    (c) gas and oil pipelines;

    (d) sewage and water service systems and lines and stormwater management facilities;

    (e) power transmission lines;

    (f) telecommunications lines and facilities, including broadcasting towers;

    (g) bridges, interchanges, stations, and other structures, above and below ground, that are required for the construction, operation or use of the facilities listed in clauses (a) to (f); and

    (h) rights of way required for the facilities listed in clauses (a) to (g).

    (2) An application for a transportation, infrastructure or utilities use with respect to land in a Natural Linkage Area shall not be approved unless,

    (a) the need for the project has been demonstrated and there is no reasonable alternative; and

    (b) the applicant demonstrates that the following requirements will be satisfied, to the extent that is possible while also meeting all applicable safety standards:

    1. The area of construction disturbance will be kept to a minimum.

    2. Right of way widths will be kept to the minimum that is consistent with meeting other objectives such as stormwater management and with locating as many transportation, infrastructure, and utility uses within a single corridor as possible.

    3. The project will allow for wildlife movement.

    4. Lighting will be focused downwards and away from Natural Core Areas.

    5. The planning, design and construction practices adopted will keep any adverse effects on the ecological integrity of the Plan Area to a minimum.

    (3) An application for a transportation, infrastructure or utilities use with respect to land in a Natural Core Area shall not be approved unless the applicant demonstrates that,

    (a) the requirements of subsection (2) have been met;

    (b) the project does not include and will not in the future require a highway interchange or a transit or railway station in a Natural Core Area; and

    (c) the project is located as close to the edge of the Natural Core Area as possible.

    (4) Except as permitted in subsection (5), with respect to land in a key natural heritage feature or a hydrologically sensitive feature, all new transportation, infrastructure and utilities uses and all upgrading or extension of existing transportation, infrastructure and utilities uses, including the opening of a road within an unopened road allowance, are prohibited.

    (5) Transportation, infrastructure, and utilities uses may be permitted to cross a key natural heritage feature or a hydrologically sensitive feature if the applicant demonstrates that,

    (a) the need for the project has been demonstrated and there is no reasonable alternative;

    (b) the planning, design and construction practices adopted will keep any adverse effects on the ecological integrity of the Plan Area to a minimum;

    (c) the design practices adopted will maintain, and where possible improve or restore, key ecological and recreational linkages, including the trail system referred to in section 39;

    (d) the landscape design will be adapted to the circumstances of the site and use native plant species as much as possible, especially along rights of way; and

    (e) the long-term landscape management approaches adopted will maintain, and where possible improve or restore, the health, diversity, size and connectivity of the key natural heritage feature or hydrologically sensitive feature.

    (6) Service and utility trenches for transportation, infrastructure and utilities shall be planned, designed and constructed so as to keep disruption of the natural groundwater flow to a minimum.

    Official plan provisions, wellhead protection areas, areas of high aquifer vulnerability
    42. (1) Every official plan shall contain policies that,

    (a) establish wellhead protection areas, in accordance with subsection (2), around all existing and new wells for municipal water services;

    (b) with respect to each wellhead protection area,

    (i) prohibit or restrict the uses listed in subsections 28 (1) and (2), and

    (ii) prohibit or restrict other uses that could adversely affect the quality or quantity of groundwater reaching a well; and

    (c) encourage restrictions on haulage routes for transportation of chemicals and volatile materials in wellhead protection areas and in areas of high aquifer vulnerability under section 29.

    (2) A wellhead protection area shall identify zones of contribution corresponding to,

    (a) zero to two years of time of travel;

    (b) two to ten years of time of travel; and

    (c) 10 to 25 years of time of travel.

    (3) Every regional municipality shall comply with clause (1) (a) on or before April 22, 2003.

    (4) Every municipality other than a regional municipality shall comply with clause (1) (a) on or before October 22, 2003.

    (5) Every municipality shall comply with clause (1) (b) on or before April 23, 2007.

    Sewage and water services
    43. (1) An application for major development shall be accompanied by a sewage and water system plan that demonstrates,

    (a) that the ecological integrity of hydrological features and key natural heritage features will be maintained;

    (b) that the quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water will be maintained;

    (c) that stream baseflows will be maintained;

    (d) that the project will comply with the applicable watershed plan and water budget and conservation plan; and

    (e) that the water use projected for the development will be sustainable.

    (2) Water and sewer service trenches shall be planned, designed and constructed so as to keep disruption of the natural groundwater flow to a minimum.

    Partial services
    44. (1) The construction or expansion of partial services is prohibited.

    (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to prevent the construction or expansion of partial services that is necessary to address a serious health concern or environmental concern.

    (3) Subsection (1) does not apply to prevent the construction or expansion of partial services if,

    (a) the construction or expansion was approved under the Environmental Assessment Act before November 17, 2001; and

    (b) the period of time during which the construction or expansion may begin has not expired.

    (4) Subsection (1) does not apply to prevent the construction or expansion of partial services in the Palgrave Estate Residential Community as shown on the land use designation map referred to in section 2.

    Stormwater management
    45. (1) An application for major development shall be accompanied by a stormwater management plan, as set out in section 46.

    (2) Every application for development or site alteration shall demonstrate that planning, design and construction practices that protect water resources will be used, including,

    (a) keeping the removal of vegetation, grading and soil compaction to a minimum;

    (b) keeping all sediment that is eroded during construction within the site;

    (c) seeding or sodding exposed soils as soon as possible after construction; and

    (d) keeping chemical applications to suppress dust and control pests and vegetation to a minimum.

    (3) In considering an application for development or site alteration, the municipality shall seek to reduce areas with impervious surfaces and increase areas retained in a natural undisturbed state, in order to minimize stormwater volumes and contaminant loads.

    (4) Municipal development standards shall incorporate planning, design and construction practices that will,

    (a) reduce the portions of lots and sites that have impervious surfaces; and

    (b) provide the flexibility to use alternative stormwater management techniques such as directing roof discharge to rear yard ponding areas and using grassed swales.

    (5) Subsections (2), (3) and (4) do not apply to applications for mineral aggregate operations.

    (6) For the purposes of stormwater management, the minimum standard for water quality is that 80 per cent of suspended solids shall be removed from stormwater runoff as a long-term average.

    (7) Despite anything else in this Plan, disposal of stormwater into a kettle lake is prohibited.

    (8) Despite anything else in this Plan, new stormwater management ponds are prohibited with respect to land in key natural heritage features and hydrologically sensitive features.

    (9) In subsection (8),

    "stormwater management pond" means a detention basin that temporarily stores or treats collected stormwater runoff and releases it at a controlled rate.

    Stormwater management plans
    46. (1) The objectives of a stormwater management plan are to,

    (a) maintain groundwater quantity and flow and stream baseflow;

    (b) protect water quality;

    (c) protect aquatic species and their habitat;

    (d) prevent increases in stream channel erosion; and

    (e) prevent any increase in flood risk.

    (2) A stormwater management plan shall provide for an integrated treatment train approach that uses a planned sequence of methods of controlling stormwater and keeping its impact to a minimum by techniques including, without limitation,

    (a) lot level controls such as devices and designs that direct roof discharge to rear yard ponding areas;

    (b) conveyance controls such as grassed swales; and

    (c) end-of-pipe controls such as wet ponds at the final discharge stage.

    (3) A stormwater management plan shall be prepared in accordance with the applicable watershed plan under section 24, if one exists.

    Rapid infiltration basins and columns
    47. (1) Despite anything else in this Plan, new rapid infiltration basins and new rapid infiltration columns are prohibited.

    (2) In subsection (1),

    "rapid infiltration basin" means a basin or system of basins at or below surface grade that is constructed in porous soil and punctures through a relatively impermeable layer to gain access to a more permeable sand or gravel layer, so as to rapidly infiltrate into the ground, at a single point or area of concentration, surface runoff collected from impervious surfaces;

    "rapid infiltration column" means a column or system of columns at or below surface grade that is constructed in porous soil and punctures through a relatively impermeable layer to gain access to a more permeable sand or gravel layer, so as to rapidly infiltrate into the ground, at a single point or area of concentration, surface runoff collected from impervious surfaces.

    PART V
    PRESCRIBED PROVISIONS

    Prescribed provisions, subs. 15 (2) of Act

    48. With respect to land in the Natural Core Areas, Natural Linkage Areas and Countryside Areas, the following provisions are prescribed for the purposes of subsection 15 (2) of the Act:

    Sections 20, 22, 23 and 26
    Clause 43 (1) (b)
    Subsections 45 (7) and (8)
    Section 47

    Commencement

    49. This Regulation shall be deemed to have come into force on November 16, 2001.

    IMPLEMENTATION

    Status and Effect of The Plan

    The policies of the Plan do not affect any Aboriginal or treaty right recognized or affirmed by the Constitution Act . The Ontario government shall consult with Aboriginal peoples about decisions that may affect the use of Crown land and resources that are subject to Aboriginal and treaty rights within the Oak Ridges Moraine.

    Provincial Obligations and Technical Support

    (a) The Ontario government shall make available to users of the Plan maps technical information on the Key Natural Heritage Features, where available, as well as criteria for the identification and mapping of these features, Hydrological Features and Landform Conservation Areas and areas highly vulnerable to groundwater contamination, as described in PART III of the Plan.

    (b) The Ontario government shall update existing technical guidelines or develop new ones as required to help the users of the Plan to better understand, interpret and implement the policies of the Plan. These shall include, but not be limited to, manuals on:

  • natural heritage;
  • landform conservation;
  • stormwater management planning, design and implementation;
  • water budget and water conservation plan preparation;
  • watershed and subwatershed plan preparation.

    (c) The Ontario government, in partnership with municipalities, conservation authorities and other appropriate stakeholders, shall develop and maintain a data management system to collect, store, update and share natural heritage, water resources and geotechnical information needed to interpret, apply and monitor the policies of the Plan.

    Municipal Implementation

    (a) The Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001 directs municipalities to bring their official plans into conformity with the Plan and to ensure that the decisions they make on development applications conform with the Plan.

    (b) Nothing in the Plan is intended to prevent municipalities from adopting official plan policies and zoning by-law provisions that are more restrictive than the policies of this Plan, except where prohibited by the Plan. The Ontario government encourages municipalities to develop additional policies for the Oak Ridges Moraine that support, complement, or exceed the policies of this Plan.

    Performance Indicators and Monitoring

    (a) The Ontario government, in consultation with municipalities, shall over time identify performance indicators for monitoring the effectiveness of the Plan.

    (b) The Ontario government, in partnership with appropriate stakeholders, shall establish a monitoring network to collect, summarize and evaluate performance indicator data to:

  • assess changes in the ecological integrity of the Moraine; -assess the effectiveness of the policies of the Plan in achieving the Plan's vision and objectives;
  • help identify improvements that would address problems encountered in implementing the Plan.

    Plan Review and Amendment

    (a) The Plan is a long-term strategic plan that shall be formally reviewed once every 10 years and, if appropriate, amended to: -include new, updated, or corrected information; -improve the effectiveness and relevance of its policies; -reflect changed or new priorities of the Ontario government.

    (b) The 10-year review cannot consider removing land from the Natural Core Areas and Natural Linkage Areas.

    (c) A 10-year review of the Plan shall consider:

  • the need to change or refine the boundaries of the Countryside Areas and Settlement Areas;
  • the continued effectiveness and relevance of the Plan's vision, purpose, objectives and policies;
  • the effectiveness of the Plan's policies in meeting the Plan's vision, purpose and objectives;
  • new, updated, or corrected information;
  • new science, technologies, or practices that shall improve the Plan's effectiveness;
  • any other matter that the Ontario government deems appropriate.

    (d) Consideration of the need to change or refine the boundaries of Settlement Areas as part of a 10-year review requires a justification study prepared by the upper-tier or single-tier municipality that comprehensively demonstrates that:

  • there are not enough lands designated in the official plan to meet the municipality's short-term growth needs;
  • opportunities for infilling, intensification and redevelopment to accommodate some or all of the anticipated growth in existing Settlement Areas in the municipality have been fully taken into account;
  • opportunities for Settlement Areas in other municipalities, or for urban areas outside the Oak Ridges Moraine, to accommodate some or all of the anticipated growth have been fully taken into account and do not adversely affect the ecological integrity of the Moraine;
  • the new Settlement Area boundary would not expand into or adversely affect any Natural Core Areas or Natural Linkage Areas;
  • the area proposed to be added to Settlement Areas has been kept as small as possible, by permitting development at densities that promote efficient use of existing infrastructure and minimize land consumption;
  • water budgets and water conservation plans have been prepared in accordance with PART III (Section 24) of the Plan.

    (e) A 10-year review may also include an examination of the Plan's policies on mineral aggregate extraction in Natural Core Areas, recognizing that mineral aggregates are a non-renewable resource that are particularly desirable this close to markets. The review may consider in particular whether to change the policies of this Plan to permit new mineral aggregate operations and wayside pits to be established and existing ones to expand in Natural Core Areas, where the ecological integrity of those Areas can be maintained or improved. For any such policy change to be considered, studies shall:

  • identify specific areas such as agricultural area, young plantations, or early successional habitats where extraction could occur without long-term or permanent loss of ecological integrity;
  • demonstrate that where any natural self-sustaining vegetation needs to be removed for extraction, it shall be rehabilitated to natural self-sustaining vegetation of equal or greater ecological value;
  • demonstrate that any non-agricultural area extracted shall be rehabilitated to natural self-sustaining vegetation;
  • demonstrate that the connectivity of key natural heritage features and hydrological features shall be maintained, or improved or restored where possible, during and after extraction;
  • identify operational practices that will minimize possible negative impacts, such as:
    • phasing extraction to minimize the extent of soil exposed at any one time,
    • encouraging rapid extraction and rehabilitation, especially adjacent to key natural heritage features and
    • limiting activities on site to extraction and rehabilitation only and carrying out other activities such as processing, washing and stockpiling on sites outside the Natural Core Areas;
  • demonstrate the successful performance of mineral aggregate operations and their rehabilitation in maintaining and improving ecological integrity in Natural Core Areas, Natural Linkage Areas and Countryside Areas since the Plan came into effect.

    (f) It is not intended that the Plan will be amended on a routine or regular basis. However, the Minister may consider amendments outside a 10-year review if:

  • the amendment would correct major or unforeseen circumstances, or would incorporate or reflect major new Ontario government legislation, regulations, policies, new information or standards;
  • deferral of the amendment to the next 10-year review would threaten the overall effectiveness or integrity of the Plan;
  • the amendment would improve the effectiveness and relevance of its policies.

    How to Contact Us

    For questions on site specific matters relating to planning approvals and transition, you are encouraged first to consult the appropriate municipality.

    With respect to the official plan and zoning by-law conformity exercise, please contact the appropriate Municipal Services Office of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing:

    Municipal Services Office - Central Region

    (416) 585-6226
    Toll Free: 1-800-668-0230

    Municipal Services Office - Eastern Region

    (613) 548-4304
    Toll Free: 1-800-267-9438

    For general matters, please contact:

    Oak Ridges Moraine Policy Team

    Provincial Planning and Environmental Services Branch
    Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing
    14 th floor, 777 Bay Street
    Toronto, Ontario
    M5G 2E5
    (416) 585-6014
    e-mail: oakridgesmoraine@mah.gov.on.ca