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Published Plan and Annual Report 2016-17

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 PART I: PUBLISHED PLAN 2017-18

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

APPENDIX: 2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT

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Part I: Published Plan 2016-17

Ministry Overview

Ministry Vision

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs works with local governments and partners across Ontario to build safe and strong urban and rural communities with dynamic local economies, abundant greenspace and a high quality of life.

The Ministry of Housing leads the government's efforts to ensure everyone in Ontario has an affordable and suitable home. 

Mandates
 
The Ministry of Municipal Affairs operates within a dynamic and changing environment that is responsive to municipal, stakeholder, and public needs, and is well-positioned to deliver on the following mandate.
  • The Ministry of Municipal Affairs helps to build safe and strong urban and rural communities with dynamic local economies, abundant greenspace and a quality of life that is second to none. These efforts include ensuring that Ontario’s land use planning policies work in harmony to manage growth, build complete communities, curb sprawl, protect our agricultural lands and natural heritage systems, protect the Greenbelt, and support economic development in Ontario’s Greater Golden Horseshoe. They also require that the ministry work with municipal partners to support municipal accountability and transparency, to ensure responsive and flexible municipal governments and improve long-term municipal fiscal sustainability.
  • The ministry’s work on the Building Code supports low-carbon standards for new buildings and ensures that buildings are safe and accessible, with a focus on building Ontario up as a leader in energy efficiency, safety, and climate resistant and environmentally efficient construction.
  • It is also the responsibility of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs to continue to facilitate the strong relationship between the province and municipalities, which include working with municipalities outside of formal agreements to ensure their perspectives are heard.

The Ministry of Housing is well-positioned to deliver on its mandate to help ensure that people have access to suitable and affordable housing and support the government’s priorities to reduce poverty, inequality and exclusion, and to end chronic homelessness by 2025.

  • The Ministry of Housing continues to transform Ontario’s housing system. Through commitments made in the updated Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy (LTAHS), the ministry will introduce the framework for a portable housing benefit to give people more flexibility and choice; it is conducting a pilot program to test alternative means of meeting the needs of survivors of domestic violence; and, it has released the Supportive Housing Policy Framework and Best Practice Guide to bring greater coherence to the supportive housing system.
  • At the same time the ministry is developing a modernized framework for social housing aligned with the government’s focus on poverty reduction, consulting on and developing simplified rent-geared-to-income calculations to reduce paperwork for tenants and housing providers.
  • In addition, the ministry is engaging with the federal government and other provincial and territorial partners on the development of a National Housing Strategy recognizing the important relationship between housing conditions on-reserve and the need for housing and homelessness services off-reserve.

Contribution to Priorities and Results

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs supports the following government priorities:

  1. Leader on Environmental Sustainability and Climate Change Mitigation: Through the Land Use Planning program, led by the ministry, the Province sets the legislative and policy framework for planning in Ontario. Land use and growth planning is an essential component in addressing the government’s environmental and climate change goals. The land use planning system advances and upholds provincial interests and supports municipal implementation of land use planning through a variety of legislative tools and a coordinated inter-ministry “one-window” model.

  2. Strengthened Public Safety and Security: Through the Building Regulation and Disaster Recovery Financial Assistance programs. The Building Code Act, 1992 and the Building Code are key statutory vehicles assisting the government to meet commitments and priorities, including public safety, environmental sustainability (e.g., impacts of septic systems on water quality and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions), energy and water conservation, and accessibility. They also support the establishment of requirements to respond to areas of importance for Ontario’s building industry stakeholders (e.g., climate change, mid-rise wood construction).

    Following a disaster, the ministry provides financial assistance through transfer payments to municipalities for emergency response and infrastructure repairs and to individuals, small businesses, farmers and non-profit organizations to replace essential property. The Province may also design special financial assistance programs to address specific needs associated with natural or non-natural disasters.  

  3. Other Public Interest: Through the Municipal Finance and Governance Program. The Municipal Finance and Governance program develops the legislative and program frameworks that require municipalities to be open, effective and accountable governments. The ministry also helps build the capacity of municipalities to use all of the financial and governance tools at their disposal to deliver financially sustainable services.

The Ministry of Housing supports the following government priorities:

  1. Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion: Through the Affordable Housing, Social Housing and Ending Homelessness programs, the ministry’s programs improve access to affordable housing that is suitable and sustainable for low and moderate income households. When people have a home, they are better able to manage other challenges in their lives. It is an important first step to moving out of poverty, as articulated in the Province’s Poverty Reduction Strategy.  In addition, through negotiations with the federal government and other provinces and territories, the Ministry advances the development of a National Housing Strategy to ensure that Canadians have housing that meets their needs and they can afford. The ministry is engaging with Indigenous organizations and partners to develop an Indigenous Housing Strategy. The Strategy will be culturally-appropriate and address the unique housing needs of Indigenous people across the housing spectrum, from homelessness to home ownership.

  2. Other Public Interest: Through the Residential Tenancies Program, the Province provides advisory, investigation and enforcement services for landlords and tenants. The legislative and policy framework sets the rules of engagement for landlords and tenants, and provides consumer protection provisions and processes for resolving certain types of disputes.

  3. Ontario’s Fair Housing Plan: Through the Fair Housing Plan, a comprehensive set of 16 measures, the Province will improve housing affordability and protections for renters and homebuyers, increase the supply of housing, bring stability to the real estate market, and enable information sharing. The Plan supports the LTAHS Update’s vision where every person has an affordable, suitable and adequate home to provide the foundation to secure employment, raise a family and build strong communities.

Programs

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs is responsible for the following programs:

Land Use Planning

The program addresses the need to support Ontario's economic development by avoiding future costs, protecting environmental and agricultural lands, and creating complete and healthy communities.

The ministry develops the policy to support the legislative framework for land use planning through the Planning Act, the Provincial Policy Statement, and unique provincial plans like the Greenbelt Plan, Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan, and the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe. These plans support reducing greenhouse gas emissions to help mitigate and adapt to impacts of climate change. 

The land use planning system advances and upholds provincial interests and supports municipal implementation of land use planning through a variety of legislative tools, and a coordinated inter-ministry “one-window” planning model. The “one-window” approach to planning provides: regulatory approvals, advice and capacity building for municipalities; access to planning tools; and the ability for the province to defend provincial plans and policies through dispute resolution and litigation.

The program has the following key measures:

  • timely decisions on approving official plans
  • up-to-date official plans reflect provincial priorities
  • increased density in urban areas

In 2017-18, the ministry plans to undertake the following key activities in the Land Use Planning program:

  • Complete its work with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry on the co-ordinated reviews of the Greenbelt Plan (including the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan and the Niagara Escarpment Plan) together with the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, consider opportunities to grow the Greenbelt, develop a land needs assessment methodology to be used by municipalities across the Greater Golden Horseshoe, assess data and monitoring needs, and engage stakeholders and the public to raise awareness of the plans and their goals.
  • Work with the Ministry of the Attorney General to complete the review of the scope and effectiveness of the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) including options, analysis, policy development and draft legislative changes to support possible reforms to the OMB.
  • Continue implementation of the Provincial Policy Statement, provincial plans and the Smart Growth for our Communities Act (Bill 73) with partner ministries, including helping municipalities to achieve complete and sustainable communities and monitoring provincial interests through the performance indicators for provincial plans and policies.
  • Continue supporting the Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy Update through the development of potential regulations for inclusionary zoning and secondary units and the creation of education and training materials to increase awareness and the adoption of inclusionary and second unit policies and provisions. 
  • Undertake a variety of policy and implementation support activities in coordination with other ministries to advance the government’s initiatives including community hubs, asset management, planning, complete communities, compact development, climate change initiatives and alignment of land use and infrastructure investments.  

Building Regulation

The program addresses the need for safe, accessible and environmentally sustainable buildings in Ontario.  The ministry administers the outcome-based Building Code which governs the construction, renovation and demolition of buildings and maintains the qualification system for most building practitioners. The ministry also supports the development of the legislative framework within which municipalities issue building permits, conduct inspections and enforce compliance with the Building Code.

The program has the following key measures:

  • enhance building sector capacity
  • client satisfaction with technical advice and services
  • Ontario is a leader in Building Code development
  • annual percentage reduction of greenhouse gas emission in buildings

In 2017-18, the ministry plans to undertake the following key activities in the Building Regulation program:

  • Administer the Building Code Act, 1992, and the Building Code efficiently and effectively to support the Ontario economy and promote innovation.
  • Continue work on developing policy to support the government’s response to the Report on the Elliot Lake Commission of Inquiry.
  • Support climate change initiatives by developing policy that would enable the establishment of new target requirements to further reduce energy use in buildings and maintain building resilience.
  • Develop policy and conduct public consultation on potential requirements to be included in the next edition of the Building Code.

Disaster Recovery Financial Assistance

The program addresses the need to help municipalities and victims of disasters recover when they are impacted by disasters beyond their capacity to manage. It is anticipated that the need for this assistance will continue to increase as a result of climate change.

Following a disaster, the Province provides financial assistance to municipalities for emergency response and infrastructure repairs, and to individuals, small businesses, farmers and non-profit organizations to replace essential property. The Province may also design special financial assistance programs to address specific needs associated with natural or non-natural disasters.

The program has the following key measures:

  • Percentage of Disaster Recovery Assistance for Ontarians claims that are completed within 8 months of program activation. 
  • Percentage of municipalities receiving assistance under Municipal Disaster Recovery Assistance that assess the program as important in helping their community recover from a natural disaster and return to a safe condition. 
  • Percentage of Ice Storm Assistance Program expenditures found eligible under the federal Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements.

In 2017-18, the ministry plans to undertake the following key activities in the Disaster Recovery Financial Assistance program:

  • Continue to implement two new programs launched on March 1, 2016: Disaster Recovery Assistance for Ontarians, and the Municipal Disaster Recovery Assistance.
  • Administer residual funding under the former Ontario Disaster Relief Assistance Program. 
  • Support a federal audit of Ontario’s claim under the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements to enable the province to benefit from federal cost-sharing for the December 2013 ice storm that affected southern Ontario. 
  • Continue participating and administering the federal National Disaster Mitigation Program in Ontario.

Municipal Finance and Governance

The program addresses Ontarians’ dependence on municipalities to deliver local services in a reliable, financially sustainable and accountable manner.

Through the Municipal Finance and Governance program, the ministry develops, and supports other ministries to develop the legislative and program frameworks that require municipalities to be open, effective and accountable governments. The ministry helps build the capacity of municipalities to use all of the financial and governance tools at their disposal to deliver financially sustainable services. The ministry monitors, measures and reports on municipalities' success in delivering on provincial priorities such as asset management planning, financially sustainable infrastructure and affordable housing, and manages issues when municipalities demonstrate a need for provincial intervention.

The program has the following key measures:

  • Provide advice to municipalities to build municipal capacity (number of meetings held with municipalities and other municipal stakeholders).
  • Deliver effective and efficient services to municipalities (level of satisfaction of municipalities with ministry services).
  • Support municipal fiscal management (number of municipalities with existing financial tools to increase their revenue and reduce service costs).
  • Support municipal financial sustainability (number of municipalities with fiscal challenges as identified from analysis of their financial information returns).

In 2017-18, the ministry plans to undertake the following key activities in the Municipal Finance and Governance program:

  • Continue to help build the capacity of municipalities to use all of the financial and governance tools at their disposal to deliver financially sustainable services.
  • Encourage greater consultation and partnerships between municipalities and local partners to support improved service delivery and provincial-municipal partnerships. 
  • Support continued efforts related to the Provincial-Municipal Fiscal and Service Delivery Review as a component of ongoing support for municipalities.
  • Work with municipalities to implement changes made to the Municipal Elections Act,1996 including providing guidance materials to the City of London as they implement ranked ballots for the 2018 municipal election.
  • Provide municipalities with education and guidance to support implementation of changes made to the Municipal Act, 2001, City of Toronto Act, 2006 and Municipal Conflict of Interest Act as part of Bill 68, Modernizing Ontario’s Municipal Legislation Act, 2017. 

The Ministry of Housing is responsible for the following programs:

Affordable Housing

The program addresses the need to assist individuals and households who cannot obtain or maintain adequate, suitable and affordable housing in the private market through a range of affordable housing opportunities.

Administered through service managers (municipalities and District Social Services Administration Boards) and Aboriginal Program Administrators, this program increases affordable housing opportunities and improves housing stability in communities by providing new affordable rental construction and repair, and homeownership and rental assistance to individuals and households. The program includes the policy, legislative and regulatory framework within which service managers and housing/service providers deliver housing and homeless services.

The program has the following key measures:

  • Households are no longer in housing need as a result of the Investment in Affordable Housing (IAH) program.
  • Indigenous households living off-reserve are no longer in housing need as a result of the IAH.
  • Seniors and persons with disabilities are able to remain living independently.
  • Reduce the number of households in need by improving access to affordable housing that is sound, suitable and sustainable for households in need.
  • Reduce the demand for services and institutional living by increasing and extending independent living for seniors and persons with disabilities.

In 2017-18, the ministry plans to undertake the following key activities in the Affordable Housing program:

  • Continue to implement the updated LTAHS so that housing policies are relevant to current realities and reflect new research, best practices, and the housing needs of Ontarians.
  • Help communities provide affordable housing opportunities to those in need by assisting service managers in the delivery of the Investment in Affordable Housing for Ontario (IAH 2014 Extension) program and 2016 Social Infrastructure Fund (SIF).
  • Continue to work with Indigenous housing partners to deliver off-reserve Indigenous housing programs, such as the Off-Reserve Aboriginal Housing component of the IAH 2014 Extension and 2016 SIF.
  • Continue to work with the federal government and other provinces and territories to develop and implement a National Housing Strategy that is flexible to meet the needs of Ontarians and aligns with Ontario’s updated LTAHS.
  • Work with the Ministry of Community and Social Services (MCSS) to provide new affordable housing options for survivors of human trafficking through the 2016 SIF.

Social Housing

The program addresses the inability of some individuals and families to obtain or maintain adequate, suitable and affordable housing in the private market, whose needs are met through the provision of rent-geared-to-income and low end of market opportunities.

The Social Housing program provides affordable housing to Ontarians who cannot afford to have their needs met in the private market. The program includes the policy, legislative and regulatory framework within which service managers and housing/service providers deliver housing and homelessness services.

The program has the following key measures:

  • number of rent-geared-to-income units
  • number of accessible units in Ontario

In 2017-18, the ministry plans to undertake the following key activities in the Social Housing program:

  • Implement a Portable Housing Benefit Framework that will offer an additional option for an equitable, portable system of financial assistance that encourages social and economic inclusion.
  • Continue to develop policy and regulatory recommendations, in consultation with stakeholders, in support of the update to the Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy related to the modernization of the social housing system into a flexible, outcome-based, efficient and coordinated system of housing assistance that will better meet the changing needs of people.
  • Continue to deliver the Strong Communities Rent Supplement Program which provides $50 million in annual long-term funding to service managers.
  • Continue partnerships with Indigenous non-profit organizations to deliver and administer off-reserve Aboriginal housing programs. 
  • Continue to work bilaterally and with other provinces and territories to engage the federal government to provide long-term funding for housing through a National Housing Strategy.
  • Support the Province’s Climate Change Action Plan by making investments that reduce greenhouse gas emissions in eligible social housing apartment buildings.

Ending Homelessness

This program supports a broad range of transformation activities associated with the Province’s target of ending chronic homelessness by 2025. The program also addresses the need to assist individuals and households experiencing homelessness, or are at risk of homelessness, to become stably housed or avoid becoming homeless in the first place. The program includes the policy, legislative and regulatory framework within which service managers and housing/service providers deliver housing and homelessness services.

The program has the following key measures:

  • decreasing the number of people who are homeless
  • increasing the number of households that are stably housed

Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative (CHPI)

Administered through service managers, the CHPI provides a flexible array of services and supports to assist those experiencing homelessness or those at risk of homelessness. 

The program has the following key measures:

  • people experiencing homelessness obtain and retain housing
  • people at-risk of homelessness remain housed

In 2017-18, the ministry plans to undertake the following key activities in the Ending Homelessness program:

  • Continue to assist service managers with the delivery and implementation of the CHPI and identify municipal best practices to promote effective use of program funding. $308.7 million will be provided through the CHPI in 2017-18, an increase of $15 million from 2016-17.
  • Work with select service managers, Indigenous organizations, Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) and MCSS to advance the supportive housing investment, which is part of the goal to end chronic homelessness by 2025. This initiative will provide up to $100 million over two years, $33.3 million in 2017-18, $66.6 million 2018-19, and $100 million annually beginning in 2019-20.  The initiative will also provide approximately $247 million in capital funding over 20 years to support the construction of new supportive housing units over the long term.  
  • Continue to assist service managers in the delivery and implementation of the Survivors of Domestic Violence – Portable Housing Benefit (SDV-PHB).
  • Support the Province’s actions in response to the recommendations of the Expert Advisory Panel on Homelessness and the Poverty Reduction Strategy’s long-term goal to end homelessness.
  • Continue to implement an Innovation, Evidence and Capacity Building Fund to support research, evaluation and capacity building initiatives, and support the required culture change to continue the transformation of the housing and homelessness system, as mentioned in the LTAHS Update. $1.0 million is available in 2017-18 for this initiative.

Residential Tenancies

The program recognizes the need for a framework for addressing conflicting interests within the landlord-tenant relationship.

The ministry provides advisory, investigation and enforcement services for landlords and tenants. The legislative and policy framework that flows from the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 (RTA) sets the rules of engagement for landlords and tenants, and provides consumer protection provisions and processes for resolving certain types of disputes. 

The program has the following key measure:

  • Percentage of complaints received under the RTA resolved through education and intervention.

In 2017-18, the ministry plans to undertake the following key activities in the Residential Tenancies program:

  • Implement legislative amendments to the Residential Tenancies Act that would: 
  • Expand rent control to all rental properties in Ontario
  • Facilitate better results for transitional housing participants to support the government’s long-term goal to end homelessness 
  • Strengthen tenant protections to facilitate successful tenancies, including mitigating the impact of carbon costs on tenants
  • Make other technical amendments to improve Landlord and Tenant Board  processes
  • Develop outreach methods and stakeholder partnerships to extend public education about the mandate and services of the Rental Housing Enforcement Unit to increase compliance rates and reach vulnerable populations.
     
  • Initiate a review of the annual rent increase guideline provisions under the RTA.

The Ministries of Municipal Affairs, Housing, Finance and Infrastructure are responsible for the following program:

Ontario’s Fair Housing Plan 

This program is part of broader government initiatives to address housing affordability concerns in Ontario to help more people find affordable homes, increase supply, protect buyers and renters and bring stability to the real estate market. While several other ministry program areas will also contribute to this goal, MMA and MHO have established targeted programs as part of Ontario’s Fair Housing Plan.  

The program has the following key measures: 

  • Investigate and make recommendations as appropriate to improve the development approval process.
  • Work with the municipal sector and developers to identify residential development opportunities and bring more housing to market.

In 2017-18, the Ministry of Municipal Affairs plans to undertake the following key activities as part of Ontario’s Fair Housing Plan:

  • New provisions in the Growth Plan that will require municipalities to consider the appropriate range of, and unit sizes in, apartments, condominiums and townhouses to accommodate a diverse range of household sizes and incomes. 
  • Establish a multi-ministry working group to work with the development industry and municipalities to identify opportunities to streamline the development approval process, and work with other ministries and participate in various other working groups across the government as required to advance other elements of Ontario’s Fair Housing Plan. 

In 2017-18, the Ministry of Housing plans to undertake the following key activities as part of Ontario’s Fair Housing Plan:

  • Implementation of a $125-million program over 5 years to encourage the development of purpose-built rental apartment buildings in targeted communities by rebating a portion of development charges for eligible new multi‐residential projects.
  • In collaboration with partner ministries such as MMA, Ministry of Finance and Ministry of Infrastructure, establish a new program to review and leverage the value of surplus provincial lands to develop a mix of market and affordable housing units across the province.
  • Set up and lead a Housing Forum to provide the government with ongoing advice about the state of the housing market, discuss the impact of the measures in the Fair Housing Plan and identify any additional steps that are required to further the government’s goals of making housing more affordable in Ontario. 
  • MHO working with MMA to establish a new Housing Supply Team that would collaborate with interested parties such as municipalities, developers and environmental groups to help identify and address any barriers to new residential development. 

HIGHLIGHTS OF 2016-17 ACHIEVEMENTS

What follows are the Ministry of Municipal Affairs’ key results and achievements in 2016-17:

     1. Leader on Environmental Sustainability and Climate Change Mitigation

In 2016-17, the ministry supported the priority of becoming a Leader on Environmental Sustainability and Climate Change Mitigation through the following actions:

  • Improved the tools and processes that municipalities and citizens use to determine how their neighbourhoods grow, and to plan and pay for this growth through the Smart Growth for Our Communities Act (Bill 73) which received Royal Assent. 
  • Continued the Coordinated Review of the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Greenbelt Plan, Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan and Niagara Escarpment Plan (in partnership with Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry). As part of the Co-ordinated review, the Ministry released proposed changes to the plans for public input from May to October 2016. The proposed changes to the plans include enhanced direction on integrating climate change considerations into planning for growth.
  • Worked with municipalities to help support implementation of the Provincial Policy Statement, 2014.
  • Continued to work closely with the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines on their mandated responsibility to review progress of the Growth Plan for Northern Ontario and undertook work to better understand growth planning issues in Eastern Ontario.
  • In July 2016 the ministry published Supplementary Standard SB-12 to help building sector stakeholders meet the requirement for 15 per cent energy efficiency performance improvement for all new houses constructed on and after January 1, 2017.
  • In December 2016, the ministry published Supplementary Standard SB-10 to help building sector stakeholders meet the requirement for a 13 per cent energy efficiency performance improvement for all new buildings constructed on and after January 1, 2017.
  • In fall 2016, the ministry launched a public consultation on proposed Building Code changes.  Phase One of this consultation included proposed interim amendments to the 2012 Building Code that support the government’s Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy, as well as a number of climate change mitigation requirements, such as Electric Vehicle charging in houses and workplaces.  These interim regulatory amendments are expected to be filed in spring 2017.

Table 1:  Client satisfaction with training, education and advisory services provided to the municipal sector regarding land use planning 

Client Satisfaction with training, education and advisory services provided to the municipal sector regarding land use planning

Statement of result:

Ministry services to the municipal sector build the capacity of municipal planning authorities to make accountable local decisions and protect matters of provincial interest. Client satisfaction with land use planning training, education and advisory services is within the average level of satisfaction reported since 2012.

Note: Client satisfaction is measured using a survey of municipal staff.  In the 2016-2017 fiscal year, the ministry changed to a biannual survey cycle.  As a result, satisfaction responses were not collected in 2016-17, but a new survey will be issued in 2017-18 fiscal year.      

     2. Strengthened Public Safety and Security

In 2016-17, the Ministry of Municipal Affairs supported the government’s multi-year priority of Strengthened Public Safety and Security through the following actions:

  • Provided opportunities for municipal capacity building through e-learning and other means, as well as implementing streamlined qualification and registration processes for building practitioners under the Building Code.
  • Developed and released the Fire Safety During Construction of Mid-Rise Wood Buildings Guidelines.
  • Developed policy and launched public consultation to support development of the next edition of the Building Code.
  • Implemented two new disaster assistance programs, Disaster Recovery Assistance for Ontarians and Municipal Disaster Recovery Assistance, to provide better support for communities affected by natural disasters.  In 2016-17, the ministry activated the programs for an ice storm in Centre Wellington and for floods in Chatsworth, Dryden, and the Thunder Bay area and Windsor-Tecumseh areas.
  • Administered funding commitments under the former Ontario Disaster Relief Assistance Program totalling over $1 million in three communities affected by floods and tornados.
  • Completed implementation of the December 2013 Ice Storm Assistance Program and submitted a claim to the federal government under its Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements for cost-sharing of provincial expenditures totalling $140 million.
  • Represented Ontario’s interests in discussions on disaster mitigation and recovery with federal, provincial and territorial counterparts and implemented the federal government’s National Disaster Mitigation Program in Ontario. 

Table 2:  Percent of Building Code Commission Decisions Communicated Within 15 Business Days of Completed Application

Percent of Building Code Commission Decisions Communicated Within 15 Business Days of Completed Application

Statement of result:

The measure relates to the administrative element of the Building Code Act. The Building Code Commission resolves disputes concerning the sufficiency of compliance with the technical requirements of the Building Code, time period disputes for site inspections and time period disputes for processing permit applications.

The 2016-17 results show timely decisions made by the Building Code Commission. 

     3. Other Public Interest

 
In 2016-17, the ministry supported the government’s multi-year priority of Other Public Interest through the Municipal Finance and Governance program as follows:

  • Provided strategic leadership on activities related to the Memorandum of Understanding with Association of Municipalities of Ontario and Toronto-Ontario Cooperation and Consultation Agreement with the City of Toronto, and worked with other ministries to ensure effective use of these consultative mechanisms. Both agreements were renewed in 2016-17 for three years.
  • Supported the continued implementation of municipal infrastructure programs and engaged directly with municipalities to encourage and assist in their effective use of long-term asset management planning, consistent with recommendations in the Commission on the Reform of Ontario’s Public Services. 
  • Coordinated provincial participation in key municipal conferences. At the Association of Municipalities of Ontario’s (AMO) conference and the Rural Ontario Municipal Association (ROMA) and Ontario Good Roads Association (OGRA), facilitated over 700 meetings of municipal delegations with 20 ministers and several parliamentary assistants.
  • Introduced changes through Bill 68 to the Municipal Act, the City of Toronto Act and the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act to support open, accountable and financially sustainable municipalities.
  • Supported legislative changes to the Municipal Elections Act, providing municipalities with the option of using ranked ballots for municipal elections.

Table 3:  Client satisfaction with training, tools and advisory services provided to the municipal sector regarding municipal governance

Client satisfaction with training, tools and advisory services provided to the municipal sector regarding municipal governance 

Statement of result:

Ministry services to the municipal sector support stronger accountability, transparency, governance and financial management practices.

The 2015-16 results reflect overall satisfaction with the training and advisory services provided by ministry staff to the municipal sector, and the strong provincial/municipal relationship. 

Note: Client satisfaction is measured using a survey of municipal staff.  In the 2016-2017 fiscal year, the ministry changed to a biannual survey cycle.  As a result, satisfaction responses were not collected in 2016-17, but a new survey will be issued in 2017-18 fiscal year.  

What follows are the Ministry of Housing’s key results and achievements in 2016-17:

      1. Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion

In 2016-17, the ministry supported the government’s multi-year priority of Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion through the following actions:

  • Implemented and delivered the third year of the Investment in Affordable Housing for Ontario (IAH 2014 program extension).
  • Along with federal government, announced the 2016 Social Infrastructure Fund (SIF) which made available over $640 million in new funding over three years.  Specific initiatives include doubling the funding to the current IAH program over two years; dedicated funding for affordable housing for seniors; funding for the repair of social housing units; and funding for the construction and renovation of shelters for survivors of domestic violence, delivered by the Ministry of Community and Social Services.
  • Implemented and delivered the first year of the 2016 SIF  $293.7 million was available in 2016-17. 
  • Additional funding was announced in 2016-17 of $15 million per year (commencing in 2017-18) for the next three years under CHPI, bringing the total annual investment to $338.7 million by 2019-20. CHPI Program Guidelines were updated and distributed to service managers.  A revised funding allocation model was approved and communicated to service managers.  CHPI provides funding to service managers to address the needs of those who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, including those on social assistance and low-income people. 
  • Developed and released requirements for local homeless enumeration, in alignment with commitments the government made following the release of the Expert Advisory Panel on Homelessness report - A Place to Call Home.  All 47 service managers will enumerate in March, April or May of 2018, and every two years thereafter.
  • Engaged youth who are homeless and youth with lived experience of homelessness, in collaborative, action-oriented conversations on key issues raised in the Panel’s report.
  • Engaged local stakeholders in four communities to better understand place-based issues and challenges in order to respond more effectively to the challenge of chronic homelessness.
  • Launched the Survivors of Domestic Violence – Portable Housing Benefit (SDV-PHB) Pilot program which expands the housing assistance options offered to survivors of domestic violence.  Over $6.5 million was spent in 2016-17 for this initiative through combined LTAHS and SIF investments.
  • Worked to implement  the Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy (LTAHS) Update, to start transforming the housing system by:
    • Working across ministries to develop and release the Supportive Housing Policy Framework and Best Practice Guide to help transform current supportive housing programs and guide future programs in the province.
    • Launching the supportive housing investment, which is part of the goal to end chronic homelessness by 2025. This initiative will provide up to $100 million over two years, $33.3 million in 2017-18, $66.6 million in 2018-19, and $100 million annually beginning in 2019-20.  Beginning in 2017-18, the initiative will also provide approximately $247 million in capital funding over 20 years to support the construction of new supportive housing units over the long term
  • Supported second units by proposing:
    • regulation to limit restrictive zoning standards for second units (through postings on the EBR),
    • regulation to exempt second units in new homes from development charges, making them less costly to build, changes to the Building Code to reduce the costs of construction of a new dwelling with second unit while maintain health and safety.  Passed legislation to allow municipalities to use inclusionary zoning and require developers to build affordable housing as part of residential development proposals.
  • Worked with Indigenous partners to begin creating an Indigenous Housing Strategy 
  • Began a modernization process to transform social housing with a focus on poverty reduction and better management of legacy social housing programs.
  • Under the Province’s Green Investment Fund, the ministry implemented two programs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve electrical efficiency in social housing buildings: the Social Housing Electrical Efficiency Program (SHEEP), and the Social Housing Apartment Retrofit Program (SHARP).
  • Participated in the closings of the Agreements of Purchase and Sale for the affordable Homeownership units in the 2015 Pan / Parapan American Games Athletes’ Village.
  • Along with the federal government and other provinces and territories, began negotiations on a National Housing Strategy through two meetings of Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Housing.  At these meetings, Ministers discussed a shared vision for housing in Canada, and their collective long-term aspirations to improve housing affordability and reduce homelessness across Canada. They also discussed 10-year outcomes of a National Housing Strategy that would improve housing conditions and affordability for the most vulnerable, including those with distinct needs and Indigenous peoples. 

Table 4:  Total number of households assisted under the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative (CHPI)

Total number of households assisted under the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative (CHPI)

Statement of result:

The result shows the number of households assisted under the CHPI by program outcome. The result reflects data for the 2015-16 fiscal year. Note that the total numbers are not added together as some households may be reflected in both outcomes.

Note: Data was provided by service managers in their 2015-16 CHPI Year-End Reports. The two CHPI program outcomes are measured by ten program indicators. The data reflected in the results represents data from seven out of the ten indicators. Three indicators were not used as data was inconclusive. There are no targets for CHPI as there is no data available on the number of people experiencing homelessness in Ontario. 

It is anticipated that CHPI data for 2016-17 will be available in August 2017.

Table 5:  Total number of households in need assisted through MHO housing programs

Total number of households in need assisted through MHO housing programs

Statement of result:

The result shows the ministry’s ability to assist lower-income households through the IAH (2014 Extension), the 2016 SIF-IAH, the SDV-PHB and the Strong Communities Rent Supplement Program. 

The result for 2016-17 (as of January 31, 2017) is 13,465 households assisted – compared to the 2016-17 target of 17,828 households assisted. 

The above table (Table 5) provides a summary of the households assisted through the ministry’s various affordable housing programs. These include the current Investment in Affordable Housing for Ontario (IAH) (2014 Extension) program, the 2016 Social Infrastructure Fund (SIF-IAH), the Survivors of Domestic Violence – Portable Housing Benefit (SDV-PHB) Pilot, and the Strong Communities Rent Supplement Program (SCRSP), as well as the following legacy programs:

  • Investment in Affordable Housing (IAH) 2011-14 program – ended March 31, 2015 – replaced by IAH 2014 Extension
  • Canada-Ontario Affordable Housing Program (AHP) – ended March 31, 2010 (capital components) and March 31, 2013 (Rent Supplements) – replaced by the AHP Extension (2009)
  • AHP Extension (2009) – program ended March 31, 2011 – replaced by the IAH program
  • Rental Opportunity for Ontario Families (ROOF) – funded through the federal Affordable Housing Trust – ended December 31, 2012
  • Short-Term Rent Support Program (STRSP) – funded through the federal Affordable Housing Trust – ended March 31, 2013
  • Provincial Rent Bank – ended December 31, 2012 – program consolidated into the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative (CHPI) effective January 1, 2013
  • Off-Reserve Aboriginal Housing Trust – funded through the federal Affordable Housing Trust – program ended March 31, 2012

     2. Other Public Interest

The ministry also supported the priority of Other Public Interest through the Residential Tenancies program as follows:

  • enforced compliance with the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006
  • promoted a healthy rental market

Table 6:  Percentage of complaints received under the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) resolved through education and intervention 

Percentage of complaints received under the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) resolved through education and intervention

 

Statement of result:

The ministry uses a voluntary compliance approach when it receives complaints from landlords and tenants about alleged offences under the RTA. Complaints are either closed at the intervention stage or are referred for further investigation if there is sufficient reason to believe non-compliance has continued. In 2016-17, the file resolution rate at the intervention stage was 90 per cent, slightly below the target of 92 per cent. Successful resolutions reduce the impact of offences on complainants and lessen the need for further enforcement actions including prosecutions.

Ministry Of Municipal Affairs Organization Chart

This is a text version of an organizational chart for the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing as of May 3, 2017. The chart shows the hierarchical structure of the organization with the top level assigned to the Minister of Municipal Affairs.

  • Minister of Municipal Affairs The Honourable Bill Mauro
    • Parliamentary Assistant Lou Rinaldi
    • List of Council, Commission and Corporation Chairs
      • Building Code Commission - Antonio Chow, Chair
      • Building Materials Evaluation Commission - Edward J. Link, Chair
      • Building Code Conservation Advisory Council - Tony Crimi, Chair
      • Toronto Islands Residential Community Trust Corporation - Lorraine Filyer, Chair 
      • Greenbelt Council - Peter Victor, Chair
    • Deputy Minister Laurie LeBlanc
      • Special Advisor to the DM- Heather Wright
      • Executive Assistant - Greg Mouchian (A)
      • Municipal Services Division - Elizabeth Harding, ADM
        • Municipal Services Office Central Region - Marcia Wallace, Regional Director
        • Municipal Services Office Western Region - Ian Kerr, Regional Director
        • Municipal Services Office Northern Region - Lynn Buckham, Regional Director
        • Municipal Services Office Eastern Region - Allan Scott, Regional Director
        • Municipal Programs and Education Branch - Andrew Tang, Director (A)
        • Building and Development Branch - Hannah Evans, Director 
        • Building Services Transformation - Brenda Lewis, Director 
      • Local Government and Planning Policy Division - Kate Manson-Smith, ADM
        • Municipal Finance Policy Branch - Oliver Jerschow, Director 
        •  Intergovernmental Relations and Partnerships Branch - Diane McArthur-Rogers, Director
        • Local Government Policy Branch - Jonathan Lebi, Director
        • Provincial Planning Policy Branch- Laurie Miller, Director 
      • Business Management Division -Jim Cassimatis, CAO/ADM
        • Corporate Services Branch - Corwin Troje, Director
        • Controllership and Financial Planning Branch - Jason Arandjelovic, Director
        • Human Resources Strategies Branch - Suzana Ristich, Director 
        • Community Services Audit Service Team - Jeff Bird, Director​1
      • Communications Branch - Mary Anne Covelli, Director2 
      • Legal Services Branch - Joanne Davies, Director3
      • Ontario Growth Secretariat - Larry Clay, ADM
        • Growth Policy, Planning and Analysis Branch - Charles O’Hara, Director
        • Partnerships and Consultation Branch - Darren Cooney, Director
      • Community Services I&IT Cluster - Soussan Tabari, CIO/ADM4 
        • Strategic Planning and Business Relationship Management- Lolita Singh, Director
        • Case and Grant Management Solutions - Sanaul Haque, Director
        • Data Collection and Decision Support Solutions - Carm Scarfo, Director
        • iACCESS Solutions - Sanjay Madan, Director

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

  Dual reporting relationship with CIA, Ontario Internal Audit Division, Treasury Board Secretariat and ADM, BMD for administrative purposes
  Dual reporting relationship with the Deputy Minister of Communications and the Associate Secretary of Cabinet
  Dual reporting relationship with MAG and MMA|MHO (to CAO for administrative purposes; to Deputy for legal services)
  Dual reporting relationship with Corporate Chief Information Technology Officer and MMA|MHO

Ministry Of Housing Organization Chart

This is a text version of an organizational chart for the Ministry of Housing as of May 3, 2017. The chart shows the hierarchical structure of the organization with the top level assigned to the Minister of Housing.

  • Minister of Housing The Honourable Chris Ballard
    • Parliamentary Assistant Nathalie Des Rosiers
    • List of Council, Commission and Corporation Chairs
      • Ontario Mortgage & Housing Corporation 
        Janet Hope, Chair
    • Deputy Minister Laurie LeBlanc
      • Special Advisor to the DM - Heather Wright
      • Executive Assistant - Greg Mouchian (A)
      • Municipal Services Division - Elizabeth Harding, ADM
        • Municipal Services Office Central Region - Marcia Wallace, Regional Director
        • Municipal Services Office Western Region - Ian Kerr, Regional Director
        • Municipal Services Office Northern Region - Lynn Buckham, Regional Director
        • Municipal Services Office Eastern Region - Allan Scott, Regional Director
        • Municipal Programs and Education Branch - Andrew Tang, Director (A)
      • Business Management Division - Jim Cassimatis, CAO/ADM
        • Corporate Services Branch - Corwin Troje, Director 
        • Controllership and Financial Planning Branch - Jason Arandjelovic, Director
        • Human Resources Strategies Branch - Suzana Ristich, Director 
        • Community Services Audit Service Team - Jeff Bird, Director5 
      • Housing Division - Janet Hope, ADM
        • Housing Policy Branch - Carol Latimer, Director 
        • Housing Funding and Risk Management Branch - Keith Extance, Director
        • Housing Programs Branch - Jim Adams, Director   

      • Communications Branch - Mary Anne Covelli, Director6
      • Legal Services Branch - Joanne Davies, Director7 

      • Community Services I&IT Cluster - Soussan Tabari, CIO/ADM​8   
        • Strategic Planning and Business Relationship Management - Lolita Singh, Director
        • Case and  Grant Management Solutions - Sanaul Haque, Director
        • Data Collection and Decision Support Solutions - Carm Scarfo, Director
        • iACCESS Solutions - Sanjay Madan, Director            

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

6Dual reporting relationship with the Deputy Minister of Communications and the Associate Secretary of Cabinet
7Dual reporting relationship with MAG and MMA|MHO (to CAO for administrative purposes; to Deputy for legal services)
8Dual reporting relationship with Corporate Chief Information Technology O¬fficer and MMA|MHO 

Provincial Agencies 

All are subject to the Management Board of Cabinet Agencies and Appointments Directive and other key provincial accountability directives, policies and guidelines. Each operates under a formal Memorandum of Understanding / Terms of Reference with the Minister that clearly states its powers, legal status, mandate, structure, financial capacities, other resources, and further details of the respective roles and responsibilities of both the agency and the ministry.

The following five provincial agencies report to the Minister of Municipal Affairs:

1) Building Code Commission 

The Building Code Commission is an adjudicative agency that resolves disputes on the technical requirements of the Ontario Building Code. All administrative and technical support to the Commission is provided by ministry staff. The operating expenses for this commission are paid out of the Municipal Services and Building Regulation (Vote 1902).

Table 7: Building Code Commission Financial Data 

2017-18 Expenditure Estimates*

2017-18 Revenue Estimates**

2016-17 Interim Expenditure Actuals*

2016-17 Interim Revenue Actuals**

2015-16 Expenditure Actuals*

2015-16 Revenue Actuals**

$69,000

$6,300

$58,620

$4,602

$108,242

$7,612


* The number of hearings is determined by the application rate. Expenditure Estimates are based on typical application rates (using historical data and projecting forward) and members’ per diem compensation rates. Member per diem compensation rates are established by the Management Board of Cabinet Directive applying to part-time Order in Council-appointed members. 

The operating expenses cover per diem fees for BCC members and reimbursement for out-of-pocket travel expenses related to hearings. These include hotel accommodations, meal allowances (to the allowable maximum), parking and public transit.  

** The Building Code Commission (BCC) previously did not charge fees. As of January 1, 2016, a fee of $177 for BCC applications was in effect.  As of January 1, 2017, the fee increased to $181.  The fee is set to increase annually up to the rate of the Consumer Price Index. Revenue Estimates for 2017-18 are based on receiving an average of 35 BCC applications per year over the last Building Code cycle (2007-12).  

2) Building Code Conservation Advisory Council

The Building Code Conservation Advisory Council is an advisory agency that provides strategic advice to the Minister on energy and water conservation issues related to the Building Code and the Building Code Act. Council members are non-remunerated appointees. All administrative support to the Council is provided by ministry staff. The operating expenses of the Advisory Council are paid out of the Municipal Services and Building Regulation (Vote 1902).

Table 8: Building Code Conservation Advisory Council Financial Data 

2017-18 Expenditure Estimates *

2017-18 Revenue Estimates**

2016-17 Interim Expenditure Actuals*

2016-17 Interim Revenue Actuals**

2015-16 Expenditure Actuals*

2015-16 Revenue Actuals**

$5,000

nil

$1,345

nil

$562

nil 


* The operating expenses cover reimbursement for out-of-pocket travel expenses related to meetings, including hotel accommodations, meal allowances (to the allowable maximum), parking and public transit. Expenditures could increase if meetings are held outside of Toronto and if there is an increase in the allowable number of members who live outside the Greater Toronto Area. 

** The Building Code Conservation Advisory Council does not charge fees.

3) Building Materials Evaluation Commission

The Building Materials Evaluation Commission is a regulatory agency that evaluates and authorizes innovative building materials, systems or designs where no criteria are set out in the Ontario Building Code. All administrative and technical support to the Commission is provided by ministry staff. Operating expenses for the commission are paid out of the Municipal Services and Building Regulation (Vote 1902).

Table 9: Building Materials Evaluation Commission Financial Data

2017-18 Expenditure Estimates*

2017-18 Revenue Estimates**

2016-17 Interim Expenditure Actuals*

2016-17 Interim Revenue Actuals**

2015-16 Expenditure Actuals*

2015-16 Revenue Actuals**

$170,000

$54,000

$84,109

$27,820

$152,616

$21,300  


* The number of meetings is determined by the application rate. Expenditure Estimates are based on typical application rates (using historical data and projecting forward) and members’ per diem compensation rates. Member per diem compensation rates are established by a Management Board of Cabinet Directive applying to part-time Order in Council-appointed members. 

Operating expenses cover per diem fees for Building Materials Evaluation Commission (BMEC) members and reimbursement for out-of-pocket travel expenses related to meetings. These include hotel accommodations, meal allowances (to the allowable maximum), parking and public transit. 

** Revenue Estimates for 2017-18 are based on receiving 6 Commission applications per year based on the last Building Code cycle (2007-2012). Scheduled fee changes came into effect starting January 1, 2015 (e.g., fee change from $950 to $5,000 per application effective January 1, 2015 and $7,000 per application effective January 1, 2016 and $9,000 per application effective January 1, 2017).  

4) Greenbelt Council

The Greenbelt Council is an advisory agency, required under the Greenbelt Act, 2005, which provides the Minister of Municipal Affairs with advice on the Greenbelt. Administrative support to the Council is provided by ministry staff and by a part-time Executive Coordinator. Council members are non-remunerated appointees. Operating expenses of the Greenbelt Council are paid out of the Local Government and Planning Policy (Vote 1903).

Table 10: Greenbelt Council Financial Data 

2017-18 Expenditure Estimates *

2017-18 Revenue Estimates**

2016-17 Interim Expenditure Actuals*

2016-17 Interim Revenue  Actuals**

2015-16 Expenditure Actuals*

2015-16 Revenue Actuals**

Executive Co-ordinator:
$30,000

Council Members:
$7,100

N/A

Executive Co-ordinator:
$4,062 

Council Members:
$ 538

N/A

Executive Co-ordinator:
$ 20,493

Council Members:
$769

N/A


* Expenditure Estimates and Expenditure Actuals include amounts for the Greenbelt Executive Co-ordinator and Greenbelt Council members. Note: Executive Co-ordinator contract expired in June 2016. A new contract started in February 2017 for 2 years, with possible extensions for additional two fiscal years. 

Reimbursements to appointed Council members include out-of-pocket travel expenses related to meetings (e.g. mileage, public transit, and parking) and meals when working on Council-related business. Council members do not receive compensation per diems. Other expenses related to the Council include French translation services (required to post Council material in French on the ministry’s website) and conference registrations. 

** The Greenbelt Council does not generate revenue or charge fees.

5) Toronto Islands Residential Community Trust Corporation

The Toronto Islands Residential Community Trust Corporation is an operational enterprise agency that manages the sale and transfer of properties on provincially-owned lands, and the maintenance and use of six community buildings, in a 262-home residential community on Ward’s and Algonquin Islands, part of the Toronto Islands. 

The Corporation does not receive any funding from the Province, and is self-sustaining through revenue generated from an annual levy charged to each Island leaseholder, rental income on Trust buildings, and administrative fees. The Corporation’s accounts are separate from those of the ministry and the province. It is responsible for managing its own financial matters, including the completion of an annual financial audit. The audited financial statement is published with its Annual Report. The Board members are not remunerated for their service to the Corporation.

The following provincial agency reports to the Minister of Housing:

6) Ontario Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The Ontario Mortgage and Housing Corporation (OMHC) is an operational enterprise agency responsible for: servicing public housing debt related to the former public housing portfolio; indemnifying the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) against mortgage defaults under certain non-profit social housing programs; administering loans and leases for social housing programs; administering legacy marketable and forgivable mortgages under previous housing programs; administering mortgages and leases and receiving payments collected by CMHC from homeowners under the H.O.M.E. (Home Ownership Made Easy) program; administering the Homeownership component of the Affordable Housing Program and its revolving loan fund; administering loans for a student residence program9 ; and addressing matters pertaining to previously-owned public housing properties, including any potential environmental liability issues.

The OMHC is funded by the province through transfer payments under Affordable Housing - Social and Market Housing (Vote/Item 1904-02) and Affordable Housing Capital (Vote/Item 1904-04). The Corporation’s financial statements are audited by the Office of the Auditor General of Ontario and are published as part of its Annual Report, and as part of the Public Accounts of the province. OMHC Board members are senior civil servants at the Ministry of Housing and the Ministry of Municipal Affairs, and are not remunerated for their service to the Corporation. Administrative support to the Corporation is provided by the ministry. 

Table 11: Ontario Mortgage and Housing Corporation Financial Data (Operating)*

2017-18 Expenditure Estimates

2017-18 Revenue Estimates

2016-17 Interim Expenditure Actuals

2016-17 Interim Revenue Actuals

2015-16 Expenditure Actuals

2015-16 Revenue Actuals

$15,981,400

$73,261,600

$20,370,000

$81,886,600

$24,972,000

$88,678,000


Table 12: Ontario Mortgage and Housing Corporation Financial Data (Capital)*

2017-18 Expenditure Estimates

2017-18 Revenue Estimates

2016-17 Interim Expenditure Actuals

2016-17Interim Revenue Actuals

2015-16 Expenditure Actuals

2015-16 Revenue Actuals

$444,000

$11,572,200

$583,400

$11,150,100

$1,916,000

$9,991,000

  
* The 2015-16 actuals are based on the OMHC audited financial statements 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  9The student residence program for Ontario Student Housing will fully mature in 2023. 

Legislation

Ministry of Municipal Affairs is responsible for the following legislation:

  1. Barrie-Innisfil Boundary Adjustment Act, 2009
    Adjusts the boundary between the City of Barrie and the Town of Innisfil.
  2. Building Code Act, 1992 
    Authorizes regulations to prescribe the Building Code. The Building Code regulates standards for the construction and demolition of new buildings.
  3. City of Greater Sudbury Act, 1999
    Establishes a new single tier City of Greater Sudbury effective January 1, 2001. Establishes the composition of the City council and sets out certain financial and other powers and duties of the new city.
  4. City of Hamilton Act, 1999
    Establishes a new single tier city of Hamilton effective January 1, 2001. Establishes the composition of the new City council and sets out certain financial and other powers and duties of the new city.
  5. City of Kawartha Lakes Act, 2000
    This legislation gives the Kawartha Lakes Transition Board the powers to enter into certain agreements on behalf of the new city and gives the new city the authority to allocate certain municipal costs to taxpayers in specific areas of the city.
  6. City of Ottawa Act, 1999
    Establishes a new single tier City of Ottawa effective January 1, 2001, including the composition of the City council and certain financial and other powers and duties of the new city.
  7. City of Toronto Act, 2006
    Provides for the structure of the City of Toronto and sets out its basic powers including the ability to regulate (e.g. licensing), the provision of services, finances and roads.
  8. Development Charges Act, 1997
    Empowers municipalities to impose development charges against land to be developed where the development will increase the need for municipal services.
  9. Geographic Township of Creighton-Davies Act, 1997
    Changes the name of the geographic township of Creighton to the geographic township of Creighton-Davies.
  10. Greenbelt Act, 2005
    Enables the Lieutenant Governor in Council to make a regulation creating a Greenbelt Area in the Golden Horseshoe area and to establish a Greenbelt Plan by Order in Council, which contains land use designations and policies to govern the lands within the Greenbelt area.
  11. Hazel McCallion Day Act, 2016
    February 14th in each year is proclaimed as Hazel McCallion Day.
  12. Line Fences Act
    Provides a local method of arbitrating fencing disputes between neighbouring property owners.
  13. Ministry of Infrastructure Act, 2011 [only in respect of clause 7(1)(b) with respect to growth management, clause 7(1)(c) and subsection 7(4) with respect to growth management and growth plans] Provides for matters relating to growth management and growth plans.
  14. Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Act
    Establishes the ministry and outlines the Minister's powers. Gives the Minister general responsibility for Ontario's housing policy and programs and responsibility for the Acts the ministry administers.
  15. Municipal Act, 2001
    Provides for the structure of single, upper and lower tier municipalities, and sets out their basic powers including the ability to regulate (e.g. licensing), provision of services, finances and roads.
  16. Municipal Affairs Act
    Sets out powers of the ministry with respect to overseeing municipal activities.
  17. Municipal Arbitrations Act
    Provides a means of arbitrating claims against a municipality.
  18. Municipal Conflict of Interest Act
    Requires council members to disclose their pecuniary interest in matters before council.
  19. Municipal Corporations Quieting Orders Act
    Allows the Ontario Municipal Board, upon application, to determine the exact location of a municipal boundary.
  20. Municipal Elections Act, 1996
    Governs the holding of elections to the offices of municipal councils and elected local boards.
  21. Municipal Extra-Territorial Tax Act
    Provides for taxation for municipal purposes in territory without municipal organization.
  22. Municipal Franchises Act
    Establishes the procedures for granting franchises for the supply of a public utility.
  23. Municipal Tax Assistance Act
    Provides for payments by the province or its agencies to municipalities, in lieu of taxes on provincially-owned lands.
  24. Municipality of Shuniah Act, 1936
    Restructures the municipality and provides for wards, composition of council, tax sales.
    Unconsolidated in 1990 Revised Statutes of Ontario, not in E-laws “consolidated law” list.
  25. Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act, 2001
    This Act provides authority to establish the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan to protect the ecological and hydrological integrity of the Oak Ridges Moraine.
  26. Oak Ridges Moraine Protection Act, 2001
    This Act froze development on the Oak Ridges Moraine for six months while a long term action plan to protect the moraine was developed.
  27. OC Transpo Payments Act, 2000
    Allows the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton and the Ottawa-Carlton Regional Transit Commission to make payments to estates of certain employees who died in 1999.
  28. Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System Act, 2006
    Provides for the governance and administration of the Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System pension plans by two corporations representing the municipal sector.
  29. Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System Review Act, 2006
    Provides for the review of the Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System governance model under the Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System Act, 2006.
  30. Ontario Planning and Development Act, 1994
    Authorizes Minister to establish development planning areas for promotion of the economic and environmental condition of areas.
  31. Places to Grow Act, 2005
    Provides for the development of growth plans over geographic regions in the Province in order to allow for growth in a coordinated and strategic way.
  32. Planning Act [except for section 35.1 which is administered by the Ministry of Housing]  Establishes a regulatory framework for the use and development of land in the Province. Provides for the Provincial Policy Statement setting out provincial land use policy.
  33. Public Utilities Act
    Most of the Act has been repealed. The remainder primarily provides a regulatory framework for company (private) public utilities.
  34. Regional Municipality of Peel Act, 2005
    Restructures the composition of the council of the regional Municipality of Peel
  35. Road Access Act
    Establishes a procedure to keep certain types of roads open unless closed by a court order.
  36. Shoreline Property Assistance Act
    Authorizes municipalities to borrow provincial funds to make loans to the owners of shoreline properties for protective works.
  37. Statute Labour Act
    Provides for duties to perform statute labour in townships and areas without municipal organization.
  38. Territorial Division Act, 2002
    Divides the territory of Ontario into geographic areas.
  39. Toronto Islands Residential Community Stewardship Act, 1993
    Vests residential community land located on Toronto Island in the province, and provides for 99-year leases to island residents.
  40. Town of Haldimand Act, 1999
    Establishes a new single tier Town of Haldimand effective January 1, 2001. Establishes the composition of the Town council and sets out certain financial and other powers and duties of the new Town.
  41. Town of Moosonee Act, 2000
    Constitutes the Town of Moosonee as a municipality.
  42. Town of Norfolk Act, 1999
    Establishes a new single tier Town of Norfolk effective January 1, 2001. Establishes the composition of the Town council and sets out certain financial and other powers and duties of the new Town.

    Ministry of Housing is responsible for the following legislation:

  43. Commercial Tenancies Act 
    Regulates commercial tenancies.
  44. Housing Development Act
    Authorizes federal/provincial housing projects, provincial housing related financial assistance, certain municipal housing powers and the establishment of corporations to construct or manage housing projects.
  45. Housing Services Act, 2011
    Provides for the planning of housing and homelessness services and the administration of housing programs by service managers, including municipalities, effective January 1, 2012.
  46. Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Act
    Establishes the ministry and outlines the Minister's powers. Gives the Minister general responsibility for Ontario's housing policy and programs and responsibility for the Acts the ministry administers.
  47. Ontario Mortgage and Housing Corporation Act
    Continues the Ontario Housing Corporation and enables it to fund and administer housing programs.
  48. Planning Act [section 35.1 only]
    Section 35.1 of the Act requires municipalities to pass zoning by-laws that permit second dwelling units in certain residential buildings.
  49. Residential Tenancies Act, 2006   [except for the following provisions which are administered by the Ministry of the Attorney General: Part XI; Part XII except for subsection 194(3) and sections 203 and 203.1; and paragraphs 61-67 and 69-71 of subsection 241(1)] Establishes the framework for the regulation of residential rents, sets out the rights and responsibilities of residential landlords and tenants and provides for the adjudication and resolution of disputes between residential landlords and tenants

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Chart 1: Investment by Vote 2017-18*

Chart 1: Investment by Vote 2017-18*  

Table 13: Planned Expenditures 2017-18 ($M)*

 Operating  $912.27
 Capital  $349.73
 TOTAL  $1,262.00

 

* Total Operating and Capital Expense include Statutory Appropriations and Consolidation Adjustments (Ontario Mortgage and Housing Corporation). Totals may not add due to rounding.

Table 14: Operating and Capital Summary by Vote* 


Votes/Programs


Estimates
2017-18

$


Change from Estimates
2016-17
$

%


Estimates
2016-17*

$


Interim Actuals
2016-17*

$


Actuals
2015-16*

$

OPERATING EXPENSE

 

 

 

1901 Ministry Administration Program

(128,028)

(22,760,228)

(100.6)

22,632,200

22,477,900

21,530,820

1902 Municipal Services and Building Regulation

(94,360,000)

(115,466,200)

(547.1)

21,106,200

26,252,000

23,318,018

1903 Local Government and Planning Policy

-

(37,853,200)

(100.0)

37,853,200

37,799,000

19,017,767

1904 Affordable Housing Program

-

(838,091,200)

(100.0)

838,091,200

879,639,400

861,914,881

Total Operating Expense to be Voted

(94,488,028)

(1,014,170,828)

(110.3)

919,682,800

966,168,300

925,781,486

Statutory Appropriations

129,028

(72,870,859)

(99.8)

72,999,887

72,998,887

100,968,121

Ministry Total Operating Expense

(94,359,000)

(1,087,041,687)

(109.5)

992,682,687

1,039,167,187

1,026,749,607

Consolidation & Other Adjustments - Ontario Mortgage and Housing Corporation

(72,616,900)

8,328,000

(80,944,900)

(81,048,200)

(78,903,094)

Operating Expense Adjustment - Greenhouse Gas Reduction Account Re-Classification

-

-

-

-

-

Total Including Consolidation & Other Adjustments

(166,975,900)

(1,078,713,687)

(118.3)

911,737,787

958,118,987

947,846,513

CAPITAL EXPENSE

 

 

 

1901 Ministry Administration Program

-

-

-

-

-

1902 Municipal Services and Building Regulation

1,000

(3,000)

(75.0)

4,000

2,022,100

280,000

1903 Local Government and Planning Policy

-

-

-

-

-

1904 Affordable Housing Program

1,000

(392,289,100)

(100.0)

392,290,100

591,696,001

150,314,466

Total Capital Expense to be Voted

2,000

(392,292,100)

(100.0)

392,294,100

593,718,101

150,594,466

Statutory Appropriations

35,200

34,200

3,420.0

1,000

-

-

Ministry Total Capital Expense

37,200

(392,257,900)

(100.0)

392,295,100

593,718,101

150,594,466

Consolidation & Other Adjustments - Ontario Mortgage and Housing Corporation

(11,572,200)

454,000

(12,026,200)

(11,150,100)

(9,991,247)

Capital Expense Adjustment - Greenhouse Gas Reduction Account Re-Classification

-

-

-

-

-

Total Including Consolidation & Other Adjustments

(11,535,000)

(391,803,900)

(103.0)

380,268,900

582,568,001

140,603,219

CAPITAL ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

1902 Municipal Services and Building Regulation

1,000

-

-

1,000

1,000

-

1904 Affordable Housing Program

2,284,900

2,283,900

228,390.0

1,000

341,000

-

Less: Special Warrants

 

-

-

-

-

Total Capital Assets to be Voted

2,285,900

2,283,900

114,195.0

2,000

342,000

-

Statutory Appropriations

-

-

-

-

-

Total Assets

2,285,900

2,283,900

114,195.0

2,000

342,000

-

Ministry Total Operating and Capital Including Consolidation & Other Adjustments (not including Assets)

(178,510,900)

(1,470,517,587)

(113.8)

1,292,006,687

1,540,686,988

1,088,449,732

 

 

 

* Estimates, Interim Actuals and Actuals for prior fiscal years are re-stated to reflect any changes in ministry organization and/or program structure. Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2017 Ontario Budget.  

APPENDIX: 2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT

2016-17 ACHIEVEMENTS

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs made significant progress in a number of areas: 
  • Supported improvements to the planning system and the related appeal process through the Smart Growth for Our Communities Act 2015 (Bill 73). In addition to the planning system reforms, the changes scoped the matters that are appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB).
  • Developed comprehensive education and training materials for Bill 73 and posted to Ministry website; broad-ranging education and training outreach provided to municipalities and other stakeholders across Ontario, including 14 sessions delivered as webinars to communities across Ontario.
  • Launched Review of the OMB in June 2016. The second phase of consultation was launched in the fall of 2016 for 75 days with the release of a Consultation Document. Approximately 1,100 submissions were received on the changes being considered in the OMB Consultation Document. 
  • Continued the Co-ordinated Review of the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Greenbelt Plan, Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan and Niagara Escarpment Plan (in partnership with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry).
  • As part of the co-ordinated review, the government proposed revisions to the plans, and successfully engaged stakeholders and the public across the Greater Golden Horseshoe and Niagara Escarpment area; the ministry hosted 12 public open houses and six technical briefings, continued engagement with Indigenous communities, and received over 23,000 written submissions. 
  • Engaged with municipal leaders in eastern Ontario to learn more about the opportunities and challenges of growth planning in Eastern Ontario.
  • Launched public consultation to support a new edition of the Building Code.
  • Continued work to respond to recommendations resulting from the Elliot Lake Commission of Inquiry.
  • Worked with the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change and partner ministries to respond to and implement the Climate Change Action Plan.
  • Implemented the new Disaster Recovery assistance for Ontarians program to help people affected by floods in Chatsworth, Dryden and the Thunder Bay and Windsor Areas.
  • Implemented the National Disaster Mitigation Program in Ontario, with 35 projects approved for $7.3 million in federal funding.
  • Completed administration of the Ice Storm Assistance Program and submitted a claim to the federal government under its Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements for cost-sharing of $140 million in provincial expenditures for the December 2013 ice storm that affected southern Ontario.
  • Lead legislative changes to the Municipal Elections Act (through Bill 181) that enhance transparency, accountability and allow more choice in municipal elections.  The changes give municipalities the options to use ranked ballots, as well as regulate third party advertising and shorten the election campaign period.
  • The ministry, as part of the LTAHS Update, examined the status of municipal second unit official plan and zoning frameworks. A five-part action plan to encourage municipal adoption of second unit policies and provisions was developed. An Information Sheet on second unit best practices is expected to be posted on the ministry’s website in spring 2017. 

The Ministry of Housing made significant progress in a number of areas: 

  • In May 2016, the government introduced amendments to the Housing Services Act, 2011 the Planning Act and the Development Charges Act, 1997. Amendments under these statutes will help increase the supply of affordable housing across the province and modernize existing social housing.
  • The Promoting Affordable Housing Act, 2016 (Bill 7) was given Royal Assent on December 8, 2016. If proclaimed, municipalities would be allowed to use inclusionary zoning tools to increase the supply of affordable housing.
  • Convened a discussion forum of stakeholders to provide expert technical advice in support of Social Housing Modernization. The Forum is supported by working groups that focused on priority areas of work including a framework for a portable housing benefit, enhancement to the Special Priority Policy and a vibrant not-for-profit and co-operative housing sector.
  • Continued to administer the Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative (CHPI), which provided $293.7 million to service managers to address the homelessness needs in their communities. In 2015-16, over 39,600 households experiencing homelessness were assisted in obtaining housing, and approximately 115,600 households at risk of homelessness, remained housed.
  • Continued to administer the Investment in Affordable for Ontario (IAH) program (2014 Extension) which funded the creation and repair of over 2,000 affordable housing units, and the provision of rental and down payment assistance to over 1,400 households in 2016-17 (as of January 31, 2017).
  • Launched the Survivors of Domestic Violence – Portable Housing Benefit (SDV-PHB) to expand housing options and choice for survivors of domestic violence.
  • Announced and launched housing investments under the 2016 Social Infrastructure Fund (SIF) which will provide over $640 million in new funding over the next three years for affordable housing, including funding for the construction and renovation of shelters for survivors of domestic violence, delivered by the Ministry of Community and Social Services.
  • Co-hosted the first Canada-Ontario Homelessness Summit in January 2017. The Summit brought together 188 partners in housing and homelessness sectors, health systems and Indigenous organizations to strengthen networks, share innovative practices and build collective capacity towards preventing and ending homelessness.
  • Participated in the closings of the Affordable Homeownership units in the 2015 Pan/Parapan American Games Athletes’ Village.
    The ministry enhanced its capacity in areas of employee diversity, inclusion and engagement through various sessions with employees and managers.

The following are the details of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs’ achievements:

1. Leader on Environmental Sustainability and Climate Change Mitigation

Land Use Planning

Co-ordinated Provincial Plan Review

A permanent Greenbelt was established in 2005 – nearly two million acres of environmentally sensitive and agricultural lands in the Golden Horseshoe are protected under legislation. Since then, the ministry continues to work with municipalities interested in growing the Greenbelt, with the focus being on urban river valleys in existing urban areas.

The Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe was issued in 2006 under the Places to Grow Act, to direct growth to existing settlement areas, reduce sprawl by limiting urban expansions, maximize infrastructure investments, and work in conjunction with the Greenbelt Plan. Both plans are required to be reviewed every 10 years.

The ministry has continued to work with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF), the Niagara Escarpment Commission and partner ministries on the co-ordinated review of the Greenbelt Plan, Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan, the Niagara Escarpment Plan and the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe. The review began in early 2015, with 17 workshop-format town halls held across the region and attended by over 3,000 people, which sought input on the existing plans. Over 19,000 submissions were received. An Advisory Panel, supported by the ministry, submitted 87 recommendations for the government’s consideration. 

In May 2016, the ministry and MNRF released proposed revisions to the plans for public input. Proposed revisions were based on the input received in spring 2015, as well as the recommendations from the Advisory Panel. The comment period on the proposed plans was from May 10, 2016 until October 31, 2016. During the comment period, the ministry held 12 public open houses, and six technical briefings to explain the proposed changes. Over 23,000 written submissions were received on the proposed changes to the plans. 
Ministry staff are analysing the input received to inform changes to finalize the plans. The coordinated approach led to a better informed review that supports all four plans working together to manage growth and protect environmentally sensitive and agricultural lands. 

Provincial Policy Statement

The ministry worked with municipalities to help support implementation of the Provincial Policy Statement, 2014 (PPS), which sets out the Ontario government’s policy direction for land use planning and development. The new PPS came into effect on April 30, 2014 and applies to all decisions made on or after that date. 

Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) Review/Proposed Planning Act Changes

As part of the ongoing OMB Review, the ministry is considering changes to the Planning Act to implement climate change actions identified in the Climate Change Action Plan to mandate the inclusion of climate change policies in official plans.  Public consultation included 12 regional town hall meetings across the province (over 700 people attended); a consultation webpage featuring the OMB Consultation Document; social media postings; a posting on the Environmental Bill of Rights (EBR) Registry; and, optional MPP-led consultations with constituents.  

 

A comprehensive analysis of the consultation input, in collaboration with the Ministry of Attorney General, was undertaken in order to inform government decision regarding the reforms needed. 

Review of Land Use Planning and Appeal and Development Charges Systems 

As a result of the review of the Land Use Planning and Appeal System and Development Charges Act, Bill 73, the Smart Growth for Our Communities Act received Royal Assent in the Legislature. Majority of Planning Act changes made through the Smart Growth for Our Communities Act took effect July 1, 2016. Several Minister’s regulations and Cabinet regulations supporting changes made through the Smart Growth for Our Communities Act took effect July 1, 2016. The legislation makes needed changes to the land use planning and development charges systems.  The amendments focus on:

  • helping municipalities fund growth 
  • giving residents a greater, more meaningful say in how their communities grow 
  • protecting and promoting green spaces 
  • making the development charges system more predictable, transparent and accountable 
  • making the planning and appeals process more predictable
  • giving municipalities more independence and making it easier to resolve disputes  

The changes are designed to make the system more transparent and cost effective, and to better meet the needs of stakeholders and communities. Municipal, stakeholder and public consultation throughout the process helped to shape the legislative changes to the Planning Act and the Development Charges Act.

Municipal Empowerment Strategy 

The Municipal Empowerment Strategy is premised on a municipality having an updated official plan, which describes a municipality’s policies on how land in the community should be used, that is consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement or provincial plan. With an updated plan in place, the municipality can be given subdivision, condominium and consent authority and be provided with an exemption from the minister’s approval of official plan amendments where minister’s approval had not been previously received. The goal of the strategy is to create a framework for land use planning, which sees the province focussing its resources on protecting provincial interests through new official plans and updates, as well as building local capacity in municipalities to make local decisions that are in keeping with approved and up-to-date official plans.

The ministry continues to implement its municipal empowerment strategy. In 2016-17 the ministry approved the County of Lennox & Addington’s first Official Plan and continued to take steps to empower 6  more across Ontario to reduce duplication and delegate local land use planning decision-making authority, including passing regulations that delegated consent granting authority to seven municipalities with up to date official plans and subdivision authority to ten municipalities.  Eleven municipalities were given exemption from seeking the minister’s approval on official plan amendments.

Municipal Official Plans 

From January 1, 2016, to December 31, 2016, the ministry commented on 17 draft official plans and five draft official-plan amendments to ensure that they complied with provincial plans and policies.  The minister also approved 14 adopted official plans and 14 adopted official-plan amendments.

Building Code

To maintain Ontario’s leadership position as having the most progressive, (i.e., safe, affordable, accessible and environmentally sustainable) Building Code in North America, as well as to support government’s commitment to energy efficiency, building permit applications submitted on or after January 1, 2017, must address enhanced energy efficiency requirements for houses to use 15 per cent less energy than previously and large buildings to use 13 per cent less energy. 
Effective January 1, 2017, the Building Code changed for certain residential on-site sewage treatment technologies to require certification to the CAN/BNQ 3680-600 standard.  This requirement will streamline authorizations and the use of on-site sewage technologies through-out Ontario.

2. Strengthened Public Safety and Security

Building Regulation 

Effective in October 2014, the ministry transferred the delivery of Building Code examinations to Ontario’s community-college sector. Transfer of these services has provided greater access, as well as a broader flexibility and choice for how building practitioners can become qualified under the Building Code. Effective January 1, 2015, the new Building Code provisions gave designers more choice in construction methods, while protecting safety of building occupants and fire fighters. Mid-rise wood buildings constructed in Ontario will meet the very high standard of public safety, which Ontario’s Building Code requires for all buildings.  The ministry continued to support building industry to implement these new requirements by releasing the Fire Safety During Construction of Mid-Rise Wood Buildings Guideline in May 2016 to highlight safety requirements while constructing these innovative buildings.  In addition, work began with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry to develop guidelines on tall wood construction (buildings of seven to twelve storeys).

The ministry also implemented the amended Building Code-related fees and registration requirements effective January 2015 and has increased these fees annually in keeping with recommendations made by the Commission on the Reform of Ontario’s Public Services. 

Disaster Recovery Financial Assistance Program 

Disaster Recovery Assistance Programs

In 2016-17, the ministry implemented two new disaster assistance programs: Disaster Recovery Assistance for Ontarians and Municipal Disaster Recovery Assistance.  The programs came into effect for natural disasters occurring as of March 1, 2016 and were implemented for the first time in 2016-17.  Disaster Recovery Assistance for Ontarians was activated to provide assistance to people affected by floods in Chatsworth, the Thunder Bay area, Dryden, and the Windsor-Tecumseh area.  Municipal Disaster Recovery Assistance was activated to provide assistance to the municipality of Centre Wellington following an ice storm and the municipalities of O’Connor, Chatsworth and Dryden following floods.  In addition, the ministry continued to administer residual funding commitments under the former Ontario Disaster Relief Assistance Program totalling $41.7 million across 33 communities.

One-Time Ice Storm Assistance Program

The ministry completed administration of the Ice Storm Assistance Program and submitted a claim to the federal government under its Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements for cost-sharing of $140 million in provincial expenditures for the December 2013 ice storm that affected southern Ontario.

Ontario expects to receive reimbursement of up to $98.6 million under the federal cost-sharing formula.

National Disaster Mitigation Program

In 2016-17, the ministry implemented the federal government’s new National Disaster Mitigation program in Ontario, with a total of 35 projects approved for $7.3 million in federal funding under the first two intakes.  Implementation of the program enables Ontario municipalities, conservation authorities and others to benefit from federal funding for risk assessments, flood mapping, and flood mitigation plans and projects.  Ontario has been very successful at accessing funds under this competitive, merit-based program, with approximately half the federal funding approved to date for Ontario projects.  Additional project and funding approvals under the third intake of the program are expected in late March 2017.  Implementation of projects under the program is expected to reduce Ontario’s flood risk and costs associated with flood damage over the long term.

3. Other Public Interest

Municipal Finance and Governance

Governance

The ministry provided strategic and timely communication as well as policy advice on local governance matters, and worked collaboratively with other ministries on issues that impact municipalities. The ministry provided information and customer service to the public, municipalities and other stakeholders on a range of issues, including in relation to new oversight of municipalities by the Ontario Ombudsman.  The ministry supported legislative changes to the Municipal Elections Act providing municipalities with the option of using ranked ballots for municipal elections, and introducing a new framework to regulate municipal third party advertising.  The government also introduced changes through Bill 68 to the Municipal Act, the City of Toronto Act and the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act to support open, accountable and financially sustainable municipalities. The ministry helped build the capacity of municipalities to use all of the financial and governance tools at their disposal to deliver financially sustainable services. 

Financing

To support growth and investment in municipal infrastructure, the ministry continued to work closely with the municipal sector on financing tools – such as development charges, user fees, investments, debt financing and local improvement charges. To encourage more efficient ways of providing municipal services, municipal efficiencies and savings, the ministry worked closely with the municipal sector on revenue tools, service delivery reviews, and municipal shared services.

The ministry completed work under the Municipal Budgeting and Long-Term Financial Planning Action Group. Its purpose was to engage with municipal stakeholders to develop new tools, including best practices and guidelines, and to support municipal budgeting and long-term financial planning in the province. The ministry worked with the Ministry of Infrastructure (MOI) and other partners this year to support changes made to the Ontario Community Infrastructure Fund. This fund is providing support for municipal capital projects, and the continued development and implementation of asset management plans. To emphasize ways of achieving greater value from existing assets, the ministry continued to support MOI and work with the municipal sector to implement long-term asset management planning.

The ministry worked with the Ministry of Finance, other ministries, the Association of Municipalities of Ontario, and the City of Toronto, on implementing the results of the Provincial–Municipal Fiscal and Service Delivery Review (PMFSDR). In spring 2012, as part of the PMFSDR, the province began uploading court security costs, which will reach $125 million annually by 2018. Along with annual upload of costs of social-assistance benefit programs, in 2017, municipalities are benefitting from more than $4 billion in ongoing support. 

The ministry supported MOI in introducing the Forfeited Corporate Properties Act (FCPA), including changes to the Municipal Act and the City of Toronto Act (COTA) that became necessary because of the introduction of the FCPA. 
The ministry continued its leadership role in coordinating the Premier’s Summit with Greater Toronto and Hamilton (GTHA) Mayors and Chairs, holding meetings in July and November.  The ministry also leads the Planning for Growth and Infrastructure Working Group, co-chaired by the Minister of Municipal Affairs and the Mayor of Ajax.

Association of Municipalities of Ontario and Toronto-Ontario Cooperation and Consultation Agreement

Both the Memorandum of Understanding with the Association of Municipalities of Ontario and the Toronto–Ontario Cooperation and Consultation Agreement, reflect the province's ongoing commitment to strong provincial–municipal relationships based on mutual respect and consultation. These agreements foster stronger relationships with municipal partners, effectively communicate provincial policies that impact municipalities, and provide a forum to discuss initiatives that can help municipalities improve their general and fiscal management. Both agreements were renewed in 2016 for another three years.

As in previous years, the ministry coordinated provincial participation in key municipal conferences: the Association of Municipalities of Ontario’s conference in Windsor and the Rural Ontario Municipal Association (ROMA) and Ontario Good Roads Association (OGRA), both held separately this year in Toronto. For these events, the ministry coordinated over 700 meetings of municipal delegations with 20 ministers and several parliamentary assistants.

Strategic Support for Other Ministries

The ministry has continued to grow in its role of supporting other ministries in developing and delivering their key priorities. The ministry participated in a number of working groups to advise ministries of municipal implications and/or support municipal sector engagement.

The ministry also reviewed and/or provided comments on a variety of private member and government bills, Cabinet submissions and related documents. 

In addition, the ministry, working with colleagues at the City of Toronto and the Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF), developed an accountability framework for the provincial endowment to TAF. As part of the work, the ministry developed a transfer payment agreement and supporting policies to assist TAF in continuing its work while ensuring value for money for the provincial funds. 

Regulatory Framework

The ministry continued to provide municipalities with the flexibility to conduct their affairs effectively and to serve their citizens. 

Indigenous Issues

The ministry provided a coordinating and advisory role in addressing municipal–Indigenous matters impacting the ministry. The ministry continued to advise the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation (MIRR) on litigation and negotiation related to Indigenous issues – such as the Algonquin land claim. The ministry participated on several MIRR-led working groups and/or committees and developed policy, and provided strategic advice on Indigenous consultation and/or engagement initiatives, within the ministry and line ministries.

 

The following are the details of the Ministry of Housing’s achievements:

1. Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion

Affordable Housing

Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy (LTAHS) Update

The ministry continued to implement the update to Ontario’s Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy (LTAHS) that was released in March 2016 – the update focuses on the vision that every person has an affordable, suitable, and adequate home to provide the foundation to secure employment, raise a family, and build strong communities. The strategy is based on six themes: 
  • appropriate and sustainable supply of housing
  • equitable, portable system of financial assistance
  • people-centred, efficient housing programs
  • Indigenous housing strategy
  • key steps to end homelessness
  • evidence-informed system

A component of the strategy is the LTAHS investment plan.
In support of the goals and spirit of the new Poverty Reduction Strategy, the government committed to updating the Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy to ensure that it continues to remain relevant to all Ontarians and reflects new research and best practices related to housing and homelessness.

Local Housing and Homelessness Plans

A key element of the original Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy is the requirement for service managers to have long-term plans for housing and homelessness in place. These plans are part of the comprehensive 10-year housing strategies developed to reflect local needs. The plans incorporate a local vision, propose some unique local approaches, and recognize that homelessness is a matter of particular concern.

 

Starting on June 30, 2015, service managers have been required to provide annual progress reports on their 10-year plans for local housing and homelessness to the public and to the Minister of Housing. Annual reports for 2015-16 have been received from all service managers. A variety of reports were submitted to the ministry, highlighting each service manager’s local housing achievements.

Investment in Affordable Housing (IAH) Program

The Investment in Affordable Housing (IAH) program (IAH 2014 Extension) is a 50/50 cost-shared agreement with the federal government which provides over $800 million of funding for affordable housing over five years (delivered over six years). Fiscal year 2016-17 marked the third year of the IAH 2014 Extension program. As of March 28, 2017, a total of 2,190 units of affordable housing have been approved for construction or repair; and down-payment assistance has been approved for 311 households.

2016 Social Infrastructure Fund – Investment in Affordable Housing (SIF-IAH)

In June 2016, the province joined the federal government to announce the Social Infrastructure Fund (SIF).  One portion of the 2016 SIF – the SIF-IAH – includes a two-year doubling of funding under the IAH, and an additional $67.2 million in federal funding to support the construction, repair and adaption of affordable housing for seniors.  Fiscal year 2016-17 represented the first year of the SIF-IAH.  As of March 28, 2017, a total of 1,481 units of affordable housing have been approved for construction or repair; and down payment assistance has been approved for 197 households.

Indigenous Housing

The IAH (2014 Extension) dedicates an additional $44.1 million in funding to an Off-Reserve Aboriginal Housing component over six years, while the 2016 SIF-IAH dedicates over $12.8 million in additional funding for off-reserve housing over two years.  In 2016-17 the ministry worked with Miziwe Biik Development Corporation and Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services to approve funding to build and repair 185 affordable units and to provide down-payment assistance to 58 households (as of March 28, 2017).

Supportive Housing Investments

As part of the LTAHS Update, the government committed to working with the ministries of Health and Long-term Care (MOHLTC), Community and Social Services (MCSS) and Children and Youth Services to develop a Supportive Housing Policy Framework and Best Practice Guide as a way to help transform current supportive housing programs and guide future supportive housing programs in the province. The Framework and the Guide were publicly released on March 28, 2017. 

To support its goal of ending chronic homelessness by 2025, Ontario is increasing its ongoing operating funding for housing assistance and support services to $100 million annually, beginning in 2019-20. The new investment will build on the three-year funding for supportive housing announced in March 2016 as part of the Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy update and the 2016 Ontario Budget. 

This will bring the total investment since 2017 to $200 million by 2019-20, assisting up to 6,000 families and individuals. 

Federal Engagement on Long-Term Funding for Housing

The ministry has been working closely with the federal government and other provinces and territories (F/P/T) to develop a National Housing Strategy.  F/P/T ministers of housing met in June and again in November 2016 to discuss the National Housing Strategy and agreed on the vision, and outcomes for the strategy.

Social Housing 

As part of the update of the Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy (LTAHS), the ministry committed to work with partners on a modernized social housing system that reflects new research and best practices. The modernized social housing system will provide a more flexible, outcome-based, efficient and coordinated system of housing assistance that will better meet the changing needs of people.

 

In September 2016, the ministry introduced amendments to three statutes – the Housing Services Act, 2011, the Municipal Act, 2001, and the City of Toronto Act, 2006. 
The Promoting Affordable Housing Act, 2016 received Royal assent on December 8, 2016, and will help increase the supply of affordable housing and modernize social housing:

  • Giving service managers more choice in how they deliver and administer social housing programs and services to reduce wait lists and make it easier for people in Ontario to access a range of housing options.
  • Encouraging more inclusive communities and strengthening tenant rights by preventing unnecessary evictions from social housing and creating more mixed-income housing.

Green Investment Fund (GIF)

Under the province’s Green Investment Fund, the ministry developed and is implementing two programs to reduce greenhouse gases and improve electricity efficiency in social housing buildings. The Social Housing Electricity Efficiency Program (SHEEP) committed $10 million to improve energy efficiency in single social housing homes. The Social Housing Apartment Retrofit Program (SHARP) committed $82 million for retrofitting high-rise social housing apartment buildings (over 150 units) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. As of March 28, 2017, a total of 1,246 units under the SHEEP and 17,954 units under the SHARP have been approved for retrofit.

Social Housing Improvement Program

As part of the 2016 Social Infrastructure Fund, the province launched the Social Housing Improvement Program (SHIP) to improve and preserve the quality of social housing and ensure its long-term sustainability.  Nearly $209.4 million in federal funding was made available in 2016-17, including funding for the repair of dedicated supportive housing units, delivered by the Ministry of Community and Social Services and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.  As of March 28, 2017, funding has been approved to provide repairs and upgrades to over 63,966 social housing units.
The ministry continued with outreach and capacity-building to inform service managers of the procedures required where potential environmental contamination exists on land formerly owned by the province. In addition, outreach and education on the ministerial consent process, benchmark review requests, and requests for Land-Transfer Tax Exemption will continue to be provided over the coming year.

Ending Homelessness 

The 2014 Poverty Reduction Strategy committed the government to a long-term goal of ending chronic homelessness and seeking expert advice, including from those with lived experience, on defining the problem; understanding how to measure incidence of homelessness, track it and collect the data; and defining a baseline and setting a new homelessness-related target. To fulfill this commitment, a short-term Expert Advisory Panel on Homelessness was established. The panel was co-chaired by the then Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing and Deputy Premier, and consisted of 14 members reflecting

Ontario’s geographic diversity and a wide range of experience and expertise in homelessness issues.

In response to the panel’s recommendations, the government committed to planning to require enumeration at the local level to gather data about homelessness. Enumeration will provide the foundation to better understand the scope of homelessness and the characteristics of people experiencing homelessness in different communities across Ontario. Over time, it will provide a mechanism for assessing progress on the provincial commitment to end chronic homelessness, as well as progress in reducing homelessness among youth, Indigenous peoples and people transitioning from provincial service systems.

In December 2016, the Promoting Affordable Housing Act, 2016, amended the Housing Services Act, 2011, to require Service Managers to enumerate people who are homeless in their areas. Service managers will conduct enumeration in March, April or May of 2018 and every two years thereafter. The enumeration results would contribute directly to the provincial chronic homelessness indicator, reported under the Poverty Reduction Strategy. Provincial enumeration requirements have been released and the Ministry of Housing is working with service managers to build local capacity to implement enumeration.

At the 2017 Canada-Ontario Homelessness Summit, 188 representatives from Service Managers, federal Homelessness Partnering Strategy Community Entities and Community Advisory Boards, Indigenous partners, Local Health Integration Networks and leaders from across the housing and homelessness sectors came together to strengthen networks, share innovative practices and build collective capacity towards preventing and ending homelessness. All Summit attendees play a pivotal role in improving homelessness and housing systems design, delivery and coordination.

Provincial action has focused on defining activities required to reduce homelessness in the four priority groups:

  • In support of ending chronic homelessness, multiple ministries visited select communities and engaged stakeholders to identify how “place” influences chronic homelessness. 
  • To identify solutions for youth homelessness, youth who are homeless and youth with lived experience of homelessness are being engaged in collaborative, action-oriented conversations on key issues raised in the Panel’s report.
  • Through the establishment of the Indigenous Housing Strategy Engagement Table and investment in the Indigenous component of the supportive housing investment, the ministry is working with Indigenous partners to support the development of appropriate housing options and solutions for homelessness.
  • The ministry participates in the Poverty Reduction Strategy Office-led inter-ministerial working group examining potential systems changes that would reduce homelessness following transitions from provincially-funded Institutions and service systems.  The working group has identified themes for further analysis, including early transition planning, removing barriers, and improving cross-sectoral planning and accountability. 

Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative (CHPI)

In 2016-17, CHPI entered its fourth year of implementation.  Additional funding was announced in 2016-17 of $15 million per year (commencing in 2017-18) for the next three years under CHPI, bringing the total annual investment to $338.7 million by 2019-20. As well, the ministry released a new funding allocation model for the CHPI funding and revised program guidelines.

Survivors of Domestic Violence – Portable Housing Benefit (SDV-PHB) Pilot

In September 2016, the ministry launched the SDV-PHB Pilot program to help survivors of domestic violence who are approved under the Special Priority Policy (SPP) to access safe and affordable housing. A total of $11.5 million is currently available for this initiative over two years.  

 

2. Other Public Interest

Residential Tenancies

Landlord and Tenant Disputes

The ministry continued to respond to complaints from both landlords and tenants about alleged offences under the Residential Tenancies Act, 2006. The ministry provided education services to landlords, tenants and stakeholders about rights and obligations under the Act. When it is necessary and appropriate, the ministry investigates and pursues prosecutions. In 2016-17, 90 per cent of landlord and tenant complaints were resolved at the intervention stage, avoiding the need for investigation and prosecution.

 

Table 15: Interim Actual Expenditures 2016-17

 

Ministries Interim Actual Expenditures ($M) 2016-17 *

Operating

958.1

Capital

582.6

Staff Strength **

(March 31, 2017)

526.0

 

* Total Operating and Capital Expense include Statutory Appropriations and Consolidation Adjustments (Ontario Mortgage and Housing Corporation). 

Interim Actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2017 Ontario Budget.

** Ontario Public Service Full-Time Equivalent positions.