Skip to content
You are here > Home > Your Ministry > Land Use Planning > Co-ordinated Land Use Planning Review > Shaping Land Use In The Greater Golden Horseshoe

Follow us

Shaping Land Use In The Greater Golden Horseshoe

Email this page

Shaping Land Use in the Greater Golden Horseshoe

Download Shaping Land Use in the Greater Golden Horseshoe (PDF)

This guide makes it easy to see how changes from the Co-ordinated Review have been reflected in the revisions proposed to the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, the Greenbelt Plan, the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan; and the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

Find out how the proposed revisions will help build complete communities and curb sprawl, support agriculture, protect natural heritage and water, grow the Greenbelt, address climate change, integrate infrastructure, improve plan implementation and measure performance, promote awareness and increase engagement.

If you need more detailed information on the precise wording of a change or definitions of a term used in this guide, please refer to the proposed plans. 

Please note: The deadline for providing input on the proposed changes was October 31, 2016.


Table of Contents

A message from Minister McMeekin and Minister Mauro

 Hon. Bill Mauro

Hon. Bill Mauro
Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry
* Minister at the time of publication

 

 

Hon. Ted McMeekin

Hon. Ted McMeekin
Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing
* Minister at the time of publication

 

Ontarians deserve communities where they can work and play, go to school and shop all in the same area.

Communities that are well-connected with modern infrastructure and accessible transit.

In other words, complete communities.

The Greater Golden Horseshoe is Canada’s largest economic engine and one of the fastest growing regions in North America.

This region contains some of the country’s best farmland and world-renowned natural features, like the Niagara Escarpment.

We need to continue to plan for a future in which we expect to have 6.3 million jobs and welcome another 4 million people over the next 25 years.

That is why it’s so important that we update the four land use plans that cover this area: The Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, the Greenbelt Plan, the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan and the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

These four plans work together to build complete communities, manage growth, curb sprawl, protect the natural environment and support economic development.

We began our co-ordinated review of these plans over a year ago. Since then, more than 3,000 people have attended town hall meetings across the region. We received more than 19,000 submissions. We heard from municipalities and many stakeholders – from farmers and developers to environmental organizations. And, most importantly, we heard from the people who live and work in the Greater Golden Horseshoe region.

We heard the plans are generally working well, but there is room for improvement.

David Crombie, a former federal cabinet minister and former mayor of Toronto, chaired an advisory panel with members from a variety of sectors affected by the plans. The panel listened, considered and came to consensus on 87 recommendations to improve the plans.

We have also met with and continue to engage with members of First Nations and Métis communities with interests in the region.

Now, we are ready to move forward.

The proposed changes would allow our communities to continue growing in ways that attract jobs and investments, create vibrant urban centres and strong rural communities. They would also minimize impacts of urban growth on productive farmland, heritage buildings, archaeological resources, green spaces, and important natural areas.

We’re proposing ways for communities to grow to better meet their needs, now and in the future.

We’re proposing to make new communities more transit friendly to help reduce congestion. These policies will also help deliver the greatest return on the government’s investments in the region’s transportation infrastructure.

And we’re going to do it in ways that better protect our farmland and natural environment.

We are looking towards a greener Ontario. We are proposing to grow the Greenbelt by adding Urban River Valleys and protecting large coastal wetlands along Lake Ontario.

Together, the proposed changes would also help the province and municipalities take major steps in addressing one of the most pressing issues of our generation — climate change.

We now invite you to go through the proposed revisions to the plans and provide us with your feedback.

You are the heart of the Greater Golden Horseshoe and Niagara Escarpment area. Let’s move towards the future, together.

Hon. Ted McMeekin
Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing

Hon. Bill Mauro
Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry


Introduction

Co-ordinated Review Town Hall meeting in Peterborough

Co-ordinated Review Town Hall meeting in Peterborough

The Greater Golden Horseshoe and Niagara Escarpment area is a dynamic and diverse region, rich in agricultural, natural and water resources. Managing growth and responding to challenges from climate change are essential if we are to maintain the high quality of life and internationally competitive economy we enjoy today.

Over the years, the province has implemented legislation, plans, policies and programs to guide the region’s growth and protect its environment. In 1985, the province established the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

In 2002, it put in place the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan. In 2005, the province launched a landmark initiative for the region and created the Greenbelt Plan, followed by the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe in 2006. These plans inform other provincial initiatives, such as Metrolinx’s Regional Transportation Plan (also known as “The Big Move”).

The Co-ordinated Land Use Planning Review

GO bus station in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area

GO bus station in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area

The province initiated a co-ordinated review of the four plans in 2015. Members of the public, stakeholders, municipalities and organizations provided feedback on how the plans are performing and how they may be improved. To support the co-ordinated review, the province appointed an advisory panel. Panel members attended public meetings, reviewed submissions, met with stakeholders, and spoke with experts. The advisory panel made 87 recommendations to help the plans better meet their objectives. This report is available at Ontario.ca/landuseplanningreview.

The province also met with First Nations and Métis communities with an interest in the region to discuss the plans. Several of these communities provided feedback and offered suggestions on how the plans could be improved. The government is committed to continuing this process and honouring its obligations to Indigenous peoples.

Urban growth in downtown Toronto

Urban growth in downtown Toronto

This guide makes it easy to see how changes from the co-ordinated review have been reflected in the amendments proposed to the four plans. If you need more detailed information on the precise wording of a change or definitions of a term used in this guide, please refer to the proposed plans. The proposed plans are also available at Ontario.ca/landuseplanningreview.

The chapters in this guide describe the key proposed changes to the four plans across the following themes:

  • Building Complete Communities
  • Supporting Agriculture
  • Protecting Natural Heritage and Water
  • Growing the Greenbelt
  • Addressing Climate Change
  • Integrating Infrastructure
  • Improving Plan Implementation

The Greater Golden Horseshoe and Niagara Escarpment Area

The Greater Golden Horseshoe and Niagara Escarpment Area

Note: The information displayed on this map is not to scale, does not accurately reflect approved land use and planning boundaries, and may be out of date. For more information on precise boundaries, the appropriate municipality should be consulted. For more information on proposed Greenbelt Area boundaries, the Greenbelt Plan 2016 should be consulted. The Province of Ontario assumes no responsibility or liability for any consequences of any use made of this map.

Building Complete Communities

Street retail in Waterloo

Street retail in Waterloo

Whether they are urban, suburban or rural, complete communities share many common characteristics. They are places where homes, jobs, schools, community services, parks and recreation facilities are easily accessible. Complete communities encourage active transportation, like walking or biking, support public transit, and provide opportunities for people to connect with one another.

Complete communities are more compact, occupy less land, reduce the costs of infrastructure and offer access to healthy local food. They also provide a range of employment opportunities and a mix of housing that offers a range of affordability. With all of these characteristics, complete communities contribute significantly to a high quality of life.

National Ballet School and mixed-use development in Toronto

National Ballet School and mixed-use development in Toronto

The Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe already includes measures to encourage the development of complete communities. For example, municipalities are already required to:

  • Develop and grow with a mix of uses, such as residential, employment, cultural, recreational and other uses that contribute to building complete communities.
  • Intensify by accommodating a large portion of residential growth in areas that are already built-up, especially around transit and in urban growth centres (existing and emerging downtowns).
  • Plan for a minimum density of people living and working in new development areas known as “designated greenfield areas”.
  • Protect land used primarily for employment from being converted to non-employment uses, such as housing.

Separately, the existing plans restrict the expansion of municipalities’ urban boundaries, known as “settlement areas”. 

Combined, these approaches have begun to reduce the amount of new land needed for growth and helped preserve natural and agricultural areas.

The proposed changes would take the plans further towards building complete communities. They would increase density and intensification targets, promote transit supportive density, encourage the development of community hubs and provide greater protection for agricultural land and natural heritage features.

In summary, the proposed changes would:

A subdivision development in Markham that features townhouses.

Compact urban form in Markham

  • Provide more guidance on achieving complete communities and require municipalities to plan for sustainable and livable communities.
  • Increase the intensification target in the Growth Plan to a minimum of 60 per cent of all new residential development occurring annually in the existing built-up area.
  • Increase the designated greenfield area density target in the Growth Plan to a minimum of 80 residents and jobs per hectare (excluding certain non-developable natural heritage features, such as wetlands and woodlands, rights of way for certain infrastructure, and “prime employment areas”).
  • Require municipalities to plan for density targets around major transit stations which support that type of transit.
  • Show priority transit corridors in the Growth Plan where municipalities would focus transit-related planning, zoning and development efforts. New policies would also provide the province with the authority to identify additional priority transit corridors.
  • Support the development of community hubs by encouraging public services to be located together in existing facilities near strategic growth areas, accessible by active transportation and transit.
  • Establish stronger environmental, agricultural and planning criteria in the Growth Plan for settlement area boundary expansions.
  • Require municipalities to identify and protect prime employment areas. Prime employment areas, as defined in the Growth Plan, typically accommodate uses such as warehousing, logistics, and manufacturing that require a lot of land and access to transportation infrastructure, such as highways and railway lines. Certain employment uses, such as stand-alone office buildings, would be permitted in employment areas that are not identified as “prime”. New policies would serve to improve transit connections for employment areas.
  • Require the province, through direction in the Growth Plan, to establish a standard methodology used by all municipalities across the Greater Golden Horseshoe for assessing land needs.
  • Provide new policies in the Growth Plan to help municipalities in the outer ring (outside the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area) manage any lands that are designated but not required for growth to 2041, and provide specific tests and flexibility for appropriate growth in these municipalities.
  • Strengthen policies regarding the preservation of cultural heritage to align with those in the Provincial Policy Statement.

Supporting Agriculture

Rural and agricultural communities in the Greater Golden Horseshoe and Niagara Escarpment area are important contributors to Ontario’s economy and our quality of life. The agri-food sector supports tens of thousands of jobs, produces food consumed by people locally and all over the world, and contributes billions of dollars annually to the region’s economy.

Marché de producteurs à BurlingtonThe four plans currently work together to protect the region’s high-quality agricultural lands from urban sprawl by restricting the expansion of settlement areas.

The Greenbelt Plan already describes and protects the land base of an agricultural system.The proposed changes would enhance the agricultural system to include not only the land base, but also the infrastructure and other assets (e.g., food and beverage processors, cold storage, grain dryers and abattoirs) that collectively support a flourishing agricultural sector.

Supporting local farms

Proposed changes to the Growth Plan would require the province to identify an agricultural system for the entire Greater Golden Horseshoe that builds on the Greenbelt, in collaboration with municipalities. Municipalities would be required to plan to protect the agricultural system’s long-term viability.

The types of uses allowed on agricultural land would also be clarified by making the plans’ policies consistent with those in the Provincial Policy Statement. New policies would ensure a thriving agricultural sector and support the production and availability of locally-grown food in our communities.

Reducing conflict between land uses

A grape harvester harvesting grapes in some of Niagara’s vineyardsThe proposed policy changes would reduce conflicts between agricultural and non-agricultural land uses (such as residential areas, major infrastructure or natural heritage). The plans would support the agricultural sector by clarifying when and how new or expanded agriculture and related uses (e.g., farm sheds) would be permitted next to natural heritage features (e.g., wetlands and woodlands) and hydrological features (e.g., streams and inland lakes), while still protecting natural heritage and hydrological features.

To minimize impacts that infrastructure and other developments could have on agricultural operations, municipalities and other proponents would be required to do agricultural impact assessments for proposed settlement area expansions or major new infrastructure projects.

In summary, the proposed changes would:

  • Require that the province, in collaboration with municipalities, identify an agriculture system for the entire Greater Golden Horseshoe that builds on the Greenbelt. Municipalities would be required to plan to protect the agricultural system’s long-term viability.
  • Clarify the types of uses permitted in prime agricultural areas (e.g., on-farm diversified uses such as home industries and agri-tourism) to align with the Provincial Policy Statement.
  • Clarify how setbacks from natural features (e.g., streams) would apply to new or expanded buildings for agricultural uses, agricultural-related uses and on-farm diversified uses on agricultural land.

Protecting Natural Heritage and Water

River in the Rouge ValleyThe Greater Golden Horseshoe and Niagara Escarpment area are home to many unique plants and animals. The region’s natural heritage features and systems sustain valuable ecosystems that ensure a high quality of life. For example, they clean our water and air, help control floods, and store carbon that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. They help us address climate change, as well as provide spaces for recreation and reflection.

The region is home to a vibrant system of lakes, rivers and streams including Lake Ontario, Lake Huron, Lake Erie and Lake Simcoe, as well as many hydrogeologic formations called aquifers (underground water reservoirs).

Water sustains life. In the face of the dramatic growth we expect in the coming decades, we need to strengthen our efforts to preserve and protect this precious resource and direct growth to areas that can best accommodate it.

The four plans already have common objectives to protect, maintain and improve natural heritage features and water quality and quantity.

For example, the current Greenbelt Plan and Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan restrict development near key natural areas such as lakes, streams, wetlands and significant woodlands.

Enhancing protection for natural heritage and water resource systems

Under the proposed changes, the province would identify a natural heritage system in the Greater Golden Horseshoe, outside of the Greenbelt Area. Natural heritage systems are made up of natural features and areas (e.g., wetlands and woodlands) and the lands linking them.

In rural areas, the Growth Plan would require protections for the natural heritage system similar to those that exist in the Greenbelt Plan. In existing settlement areas, the protections in the Provincial Policy Statement for natural heritage systems would continue to apply. Municipalities would be required to maintain the interconnections and diversity of the natural heritage system on any new lands added to a settlement area.

Revised water policies in the Greenbelt Plan would require any development in important water features, such as significant groundwater recharge areas, to ensure that water quantity and quality is maintained. This is also reflected in new policies in the Growth Plan applicable to rural areas. Proposed revisions to the Niagara Escarpment Plan’s water resource policies would be aligned more closely with other provincial land use plans.

Watersheds are the area of land drained by a particular river. By requiring watershed planning, the Growth Plan and Greenbelt Plan would be aligned with the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan. Watershed planning identifies water resource systems and informs planning for water and wastewater servicing and stormwater management. This ensures that as communities grow, water quality and quantity is protected, improved or restored.

Proposed policies in the plans would encourage municipalities to develop ways to re-use soil excavated from developments (i.e., “fill”) and include sustainable soil management practices in planning approvals. The goal is to sustainably manage excess soil produced by infrastructure and other development projects.

Land use designation mapping in the Niagara Escarpment Plan, some of which dates back to 1985, would be updated to ensure it is accurate and current.

In summary, the proposed changes would:

  • Require the province to identify a natural heritage system across the Greater Golden Horseshoe.
  • Apply natural heritage and water protection policies consistent with the Greenbelt Plan outside settlement areas across the entire Greater Golden Horseshoe.
  • Direct municipalities to avoid settlement area expansion into natural heritage systems with important water features, where possible.
  • Require that natural heritage systems are protected if and when they are incorporated into an expanded settlement area.
  • Require watershed planning across the Greater Golden Horseshoe.
  • Encourage municipalities to develop soil re-use strategies and sustainably manage excess soil through planning approvals.
  • Update land use designation mapping in the Niagara Escarpment Plan to reflect the most current and accurate information.

Growing the Greenbelt

Glenorchy Conservation Area in OakvilleThe Greenbelt Area comprises 800,000 hectares (almost two million acres) covered by the Greenbelt Plan, the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan, and the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

These three Greenbelt plans permanently protect important natural heritage and agricultural areas from urban sprawl. They also support a wide range of economic, recreational and cultural opportunities.

Proposed amendments

If approved, new policies in the Greenbelt Plan would describe ways the Greenbelt could be grown.

Specifically, 21 major river valleys and seven associated coastal wetlands would be added to the Greenbelt Plan’s “Urban River Valley” designation.

In addition, four parcels of land identified by the City of Hamilton and the Region of Niagara would be added to the Greenbelt Plan’s “Protected Countryside” designation.

Proposed new policies in the Greenbelt Plan would support a provincially led process to identify additional areas of ecological significance and important water features where urbanization should not occur. This work would build on the Greenbelt Plan by considering connections to the agricultural, natural heritage and water resource systems.

The province is also looking at the possible expansion of the Greenbelt outside of the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area where important water resources are under pressure from urban growth.

Under the proposed changes to the Greenbelt Plan, municipal support would not be required to add new lands to the Greenbelt.

The Niagara Escarpment Commission has proposed expanding the Niagara Escarpment Plan Area by approximately 45,000 hectares to provide greater protection to the Niagara Escarpment’s natural heritage and water features and functions, and its cultural heritage and scenic resources. The Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry has asked the Niagara Escarpment Commission to seek feedback from the public, municipalities, First Nations and Métis communities, and stakeholders on these proposals.

Natural area outside of BurlingtonIn summary, the proposed changes would:

  • Grow the Greenbelt to include major river valleys and large coastal wetlands. “Urban River Valley” policies in the Greenbelt Plan would apply only to publicly owned lands in these areas (existing land use permissions on privately owned lands in “Urban River Valley” areas would not change).
  • Not require municipal support to add lands to the Greenbelt.
  • Add four parcels of land identified by the City of Hamilton and Niagara Region to the Greenbelt Plan’s “Protected Countryside” designation. Protected Countryside policies would apply to both public and private land in these four new areas.

Addressing Climate Change

Climate change is one of the most pressing issues facing our generation. Ontario is a leader in North America in the fight against climate change. We are taking strong action now to protect Ontario’s economy, environment, and quality of life.

Since most of Ontario’s greenhouse gas emissions originate in the transportation, industrial and building sectors, the impact of the four plans’ policies on these activities has implications for the province’s climate change goals. Ontario’s Climate Change Strategy identifies improved transportation and land use planning initiatives as key to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The strategy helps Ontario move towards “net-zero communities”. These communities use low-carbon or carbon-free sources of energy and offset the release of any greenhouse gas emissions they produce.

Solar panel installation in southwestern OntarioThe four plans’ policies support reducing greenhouse gas emissions to address the impacts of climate change. The plans work together to curb urban sprawl and create healthy, walkable, higher-density communities that support transit and have more green space. Since these compact, complete communities are more energy efficient, they also produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions.

The Greenbelt acts as a carbon sink. It absorbs and stores greenhouse gases, reducing the region’s overall emissions. The Greater Golden Horseshoe’s agricultural land and water resources will become increasingly important as other food producing regions face lower crop yields due to changes in weather patterns.

Responding to climate change

The proposed revisions to the plans would require all municipalities in the Greater Golden Horseshoe to incorporate climate change policies in their official plans. These policies would help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and address climate change adaptation goals. Municipalities in the Greater Golden Horseshoe would also be encouraged to Inventory greenhouse gas emissions and develop targets to reduce them.

Under proposed new policies in the Growth Plan, Greenbelt Plan and Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan, municipalities would be required to develop plans for managing stormwater in their settlement areas. These plans would incorporate low-impact development techniques (which manage rainfall at the source) and green infrastructure. Proposals for major developments (e.g., plans of subdivision, settlement area expansions, and secondary plans) would have to be supported by plans for stormwater management. Municipalities would also be required to examine their infrastructure for weaknesses and identify priority actions to increase their resilience and decrease the risks associated with extreme weather events.

Other proposed changes to the plans, described in greater detail in other sections, would also make an important contribution to Ontario’s Climate Change Strategy. These include increased intensification targets, higher density targets for greenfield developments, and enhanced policies that support transit in the Growth Plan. In addition to using less land for growth, the plans’ policies are intended to make transit use a sustainable and preferred choice. The enhanced policies pertaining to agriculture and natural heritage (e.g., wetlands and woodlands) would further protect and restore ecosystem services and green infrastructure, helping us mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change.

In summary, the proposed changes would:

  • Require upper- and single-tier municipalities to incorporate climate change policies in their official plans, consistent with the objectives of the province’s Climate Change Strategy and greenhouse gas reduction targets.
  • Encourage municipalities to develop greenhouse gas inventories, emission reduction strategies, and related targets and performance measures.
  • Require municipalities to undertake more comprehensive stormwater management planning for their settlement areas and for major developments and to examine their infrastructure for weaknesses associated with climate change.
  • Encourage the use of green infrastructure and require low-impact development techniques that include integrating green space in design strategies, landscaping with native plants, and using natural water systems to generate less runoff from developed land.
  • Enhance policies to align with those in the Provincial Policy Statement regarding planning for resilient infrastructure.

Integrating Infrastructure

Matching infrastructure investments with long-term land use decisions makes the best use of our limited resources, reduces overall costs and can shorten construction time. It ensures that infrastructure is built where it is needed, when it is needed.

GO transit on the Milton rail corridorThe Growth Plan, the Greenbelt Plan and the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan all have policies that promote a co-ordinated approach to infrastructure and land use planning. The population and employment forecasts of the Growth Plan are used by municipalities to develop their official plans. The official plans, in turn, inform the planning for transportation, water, wastewater, stormwater management and other infrastructure.

Integrating land use and infrastructure planning

Proposed changes would ensure a more integrated approach to land use and infrastructure planning.

All major planned and existing transportation corridors (e.g., highways and railroads), intermodal hubs (where goods are moved from one type of transport to another), and major ports are identified in an updated Schedule 6 of the Growth Plan (“Moving Goods”). All major planned and existing transit corridors are shown in an updated Schedule 5 (“Moving People”).

To ensure efficient and quick movement of goods and a stronger manufacturing economy, municipalities would be required to use provincially established freight-supportive planning practices. New policies in the Growth Plan would also protect existing and planned infrastructure corridors from being impacted by conflicting adjacent land uses.

Viva bus stop in York RegionPolicies would also encourage the placement of linear infrastructure (e.g., roads, pipes, and electricity transmission wires) all together in the same areas or corridors, where appropriate.

Enhanced density and intensification requirements, particularly around major transit station areas, would ensure value for money and provide residents with transportation options. Requiring plans for managing stormwater before expanding settlement area boundaries or permitting major development would also help to better align land use with infrastructure planning. Encouraging public services to locate together in existing public buildings would help establish community hubs that integrate services while reducing the cost of constructing new facilities.

Making these changes will better link provincial initiatives including the review of Metrolinx’s “The Big Move”, the implementation of regional express rail service across the region, and the ongoing development of the Greater Golden Horseshoe Transportation Plan.

In summary, the proposed changes would:

  • Direct planning authorities to take an integrated approach to land use and infrastructure planning.
  • Include mapping of planned, conceptual, and existing transportation corridors, as well as major ports and intermodal hubs.
  • Include mapping of the region’s higher order transit network, including priority transit corridors.
  • Clarify requirements in the Growth Plan to protect infrastructure corridors and support the movement of goods.
  • Encourage the placement of linear infrastructure together in the same areas or corridors, where appropriate.

Improving Plan Implementation

The four plans were established at different times, for different areas, and with different but complementary visions. There are differences in the direction they provide, the terminology that they use, and how they interact with other planning documents.

Mount Pleasant Village development in BramptonThe Growth Plan, Greenbelt Plan, and the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan are implemented by local governments through the municipal planning process. Municipalities must amend their official plans to conform with these plans within specific, but differing timeframes. The province proposes to co-ordinate when these revised plans will come into effect. The deadline for municipalities to conform with the Growth Plan would be set to give municipalities, stakeholders and provincial ministries sufficient time to implement the range of changes proposed.

The Niagara Escarpment Plan is implemented by the Niagara Escarpment Commission through the approval of development permits in the plan area. To better harmonize and align with the rest of the planning framework in the region, including the Provincial Policy Statement, the Niagara Escarpment Plan’s policies would be updated and streamlined.

Generally, any decisions made on land use planning matters on or after the effective dates of revised plans would be subject to the revised policies. Decisions made before the effective date would have to conform with the existing plans.

Many of the proposed changes aim to make the policies in the four plans consistent and fully integrated with each other and the Provincial Policy Statement. To support the implementation of all of the proposed changes to the four plans, guidance materials will be produced for the following areas:

  • Standard methodology for land needs assessment.
  • Identification of an agricultural system and related guidance.
  • Mapping of a natural heritage system outside of the Greenbelt Area.
  • Watershed planning and stormwater management.
  • Developing greenhouse gas inventories, targets and emission reduction strategies.

Street-level retail and transportation options in Roncesvalles, TorontoIn summary, the proposed changes would:

  • Align with other provincial initiatives which complement the land use planning framework in the region (e.g., the Lake Simcoe Protection Plan, Ontario’s Great Lakes Strategy and source water protection plans).
  • Clarify in the Growth Plan how municipalities allocate and plan to accommodate their forecasted growth to ensure opportunities for intensification, support for transit and the development of complete communities are maximized.
  • Require in the Growth Plan that only those upper- and single-tier municipalities in the outer ring of the Greater Golden Horseshoe without urban growth centres would be eligible for alternative targets for intensification and greenfield density.
  • Municipalities would have to revisit their existing targets. Revised policies would also require that any alternative target for a municipality be publicly requested by its council.
  • Require upper- and single-tier municipalities to measure and report on implementation.
  • Update and streamline the Niagara Escarpment Plan’s policies and land use designations and align them with those found in the other plans and the Provincial Policy Statement.

Measuring Performance, Promoting Awareness and Increasing Engagement

Co-ordinated Review regional Town Hall meeting in AjaxWe received suggestions from experts, stakeholders, municipalities, conservation authorities, First Nations and Métis communities, the public, and the advisory panel about the steps we need to take beyond the policies contained in the four plans. Measuring the four plans’ performance and promoting public awareness and engagement were mentioned as top priorities.

Reliable data and information will be essential to implementing the plans’ objectives and determining if the desired changes are taking effect.

To meet this goal, the province will work with stakeholders, municipalities, conservation authorities, First Nations and Métis communities, experts and the general public to monitor the implementation and progress of the plans. In addition, upper- and single-tier municipalities would have to report on plan implementation regularly. The province would also now have the authority to obtain data directly from municipalities on implementation.

To ensure the success of the four plans, the province and the Niagara Escarpment Commission will, over the longer-term, build on their existing education and outreach programs to explain the intent of the plans, report on their progress, and promote their benefits.

Seeking Feedback

The Ontario government is seeking feedback on these proposed changes to the plans.

Provide your feedback.

We want to hear your comments and feedback on the proposed changes to the plans.

Please visit ontario.ca/landuseplanningreview to:

Submit or upload your feedback and comments using the online e-form by October 31, 2016.

Learn more about attending a Public Open House in your area.

Other ways to provide feedback

Martin Goodman Trail in TorontoYou also have the option to submit comments using one of the other methods listed below.

Environmental Bill of Rights Registry at ontario.ca/ebr

  1. Proposed Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, 2016. Notice #012-7194
  2. Proposed Greenbelt Plan (2016). Notice #012-7195
  3. Proposed Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan (2016). Notice #012-7197
  4. Proposed Niagara Escarpment Plan (2016). Notice #012-7228
  5. Proposed Amendment to the Greenbelt Area Boundary Regulation. Notice #012-7198

All comments received on proposed changes to the Niagara Escarpment Plan will also be shared with the Niagara Escarpment Commission. Comments can also be submitted directly to the Niagara Escarpment Commission at escarpment.org/planreview.

Regulatory Registry at ontariocanada.com/registry

  1. Proposed Amendment to the Greenbelt Area Boundary Regulation. Notice #16-MAH017
  2. Proposed Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan (2016). Notice #16-MAH016

Comments may also be mailed to:

Land Use Planning Review
Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing
Ontario Growth Secretariat
777 Bay Street, Suite 425 (4th floor)
Toronto, ON M5G 2E5

Please note that the deadline for providing feedback has been extended to October 31, 2016.


Notice Regarding Collection of Information

Any collection of personal information for the Co-ordinated Land Use Planning Review is in accordance with subsection 39(2) of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

It is collected under the authority of the legislation establishing the four plans for the purpose of obtaining input on revisions to the plans.

If you have questions about the collection, use, and disclosure of this information, please contact the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Senior Information and Privacy Advisor, 777 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2E5, 416-585-7094.

Organizations and Businesses:

Comments or submissions made on behalf of an organization or business may be shared or disclosed. By submitting comments you are deemed to consent to the sharing of information contained in the comments and your business contact information. Business contact information is the name, title and contact information of anyone submitting comments in a business, professional or official capacity.

Individuals:

Personal contact information will be used only to contact you and will not be shared. Please be aware that any comments provided may be shared or disclosed once personal information is removed. Personal information includes your name, home address and personal e-mail address.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing
© Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2016
ISBN 978-1-4606-7531-1 (Print)
ISBN 978-1-4606-7533-5 (PDF)
ISBN 978-1-4606-7532-8 (HTML)

Disponible en français